A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets

By John Pilling | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Eugenio Montale (1896-1981)

Born in Genoa, the youngest son of a businessman. Deeply impressed by the landscape of the Ligurian coast, where his formative years were spent. Called up for military service in 1917, after which he abandoned his first ambition to be an opera singer and began to write the poems of Ossi di Seppia which were to make him famous. Moved to Florence in 1927, where he worked for a publisher and was appointed director of a library. Considered his twenty years in Florence the most important so far as his cultural development was concerned, though his non-alignment with the Fascist authorities caused him to lose his job and to be viewed with suspicion. Supported himself by translation during the war years and shielded the poet Saba from Fascist persecution. Turned to journalism after the war, moving in 1948 to Milan, where he was given a regular column in the Corriere della Sera. Began to paint in watercolour in 1946 during his wife's illness in a sanatorium. Travelled widely throughout Europe and the Middle East in the immediate post-war period; a regular first-nighter at La Scala for many years. Internationally known before the Second World War, but especially highly regarded at home and abroad in the years since the war. Deeply distressed by the death of his wife in 1963, and thereafter increasingly solitary. Made a senator for life in 1968. A trenchant critic of modern culture in his journalism and in his prose writings; an accomplished translator, especially of English poetry.

In an essay on T. S. Eliot published in 1947 Montale spoke of

-266-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Reader's Guide to Fifty Modern European Poets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 479

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?