The Past and Future of Presidential Debates

By Austin Ranney | Go to book overview

Discussion

STEVEN H. CHAFFEE, University of Wisconsin: The paper is fascinating, and I am going to use it and quote you a great deal. I want to ask you about something you rather glossed over. In the period between the convention and the debates, Ford picked up a lot of votes. Immediately after the convention, Ford issued the challenge. Did you get any data to indicate that the issuance of the challenge produced new support? Ford seemed to pick up a lot in that period, and yet you state that "the debate challenge satisfied our need to mount an aggressive comefrom-behind campaign." Do you have any evidence on that?

CHENEY: No, I don't. The only data I have seen on the subject would be the work Bob Teeter did in connection with the campaign in 1976, and I don't believe he has anything that would indicate specifically why we closed as fast as we did in September.

I would not overemphasize the role of the debates. From the standpoint of the Ford campaign, we had really two general targets or areas of concern. One was the impact of the debates on the voters. The other was the impact on what I have generally referred to as "campaign dynamics." Ford's acceptance speech in Kansas City clearly was a major plus for the campaign. We thought it was good enough that we paid to rerun it again later on television. Other positive factors were that we left Kansas City having maintained effective, if somewhat tenuous, control of the convention; the acceptance address was a success; the Reagan challenge was over; and Jimmy Carter spent his time, in July and August, down in Plains planning the fall campaign and draining the fish pond.

All those things were working for us as we moved into September, so that we got the result we had anticipated at the outset. But I could not say that the closing of the gap between late July and early September, or even late September, was due specifically to the debate challenge. The debate challenge was important because it let us acquire a posture of going on the offensive as we came out of Kansas City, even though we were some thirty points behind and even though

-131-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Past and Future of Presidential Debates
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Contents *
  • Preface *
  • 1 - Presidential Candidate "Debates": What Can We Learn from 1960 1
  • Discussion 51
  • 2 - Historical Evolution of Section 315 56
  • Discussion 70
  • 3 - Presidential Debates: an Empirical Assessment 75
  • Discussion 102
  • 4 - The 1976 Presidential Debates: a Republican Perspective 107
  • Discussion 131
  • 5 - Did the Debates Help Jimmy Carter? 137
  • Discussion 147
  • 6 - The Case for Permanent Presidential Debates 155
  • Discussion 169
  • 7 - Debatable Thoughts on Presidential Debates 175
  • Discussion 187
  • 8 - Presidential Debates: an Overview 191
  • Discussion 206
  • Bibliography 215
  • Contributors 225
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 226

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.