Chapter Eight
TRANSLATION AND STYLE

'Mystérieux pouvoir du goût, d'une langue saine, d'un beau style! Ce Maloryne fut qu'un traducteur, un adaptateur: sans lui pourtant, dans l'Angleterre d'aujourd'hui, ni la poésie, ni la pensée, ni l'art ne seraient tout-à-fait ce qu'ils sont.'--JOSEPH BÉDIER.

WE may question Malory's merit as a story-teller, disagree with his interpretation of the Romance, and even whittle down his claims to originality; but his Morte Darthur, whatever its failings, possesses one important and unchallengeable quality: its style. We know that Caxton was puzzled as to the form in which to give his translations, for, in his time, there was no common standard of English: 'and thus', he said, 'betwene playne and rude and curyous termes I stand abasshed; but in my judgemente, the comyn termes that be dayli used ben lyghter to be understonde than the olde an auncyent englysshe'. Doubtless Malory shared this view and indirectly helped Caxton to solve his problem. In his translation of the 'French books' he also used words which, slightly archaic though they were, sound even now as 'comyn termes that be dayli used', and for this reason his work has preserved the same appeal it had four hundred and fifty years ago, when it was first brought within the reach of 'al noble lordes and ladyes wyth al other estates, of what estate or degree they ben of'.

As far as we can judge, Malory had a good reading knowledge of contemporary and medieval French. He occasionally misread his original1; most of his errors, however, are due to carelessness, and on the whole his

____________________
1
He takes li rois regarde contre mont la riviere (meaning: 'the king looked up the stream', MS. Huth, f. 198r, col. 1) to mean the kynge loked aboute the world (p. 125); translates il beast by he was . . . open mouthed (v. infra, p. 152), and abandonement by secretly. The French (MS. B.N. fr. 99,

-100-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Malory
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations x
  • Chapter One - Sir Thomas Malory and His Printer 1
  • Chapter Two - the Genesis of Arthurian Romance 14
  • Chapter Three - Narrative Technique 29
  • Chapter Four - Romance and Realism 43
  • Chapter Five - the Genius of Chivalry 55
  • Chapter Six - Camelot and Corbenic 70
  • Chapter Seven - the New Arthuriad 85
  • Chapter Eight Translation and Style 100
  • Conclusion 109
  • Appendix One Materials for Malory's Biography 115
  • Appendix Two the Sources of the Mort Darthur 128
  • Appendix Three 155
  • Bibliography 189
  • Index 199
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 210

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.