The Crime Conundrum: Essays on Criminal Justice

By Lawrence M. Friedman; George Fisher | Go to book overview

About the Editors and Contributors

Jonathan D. Casper is Professor and Chair of the Political Science Department at Northwestern University and a Senior Research Fellow at the American Bar Foundation. His research interests have included the role of attorneys in civil liberties and civil rights cases before the Supreme Court; defendant attitudes towards their experiences in criminal courts; pleabargaining and sentencing reform; and in recent years the role of information processing and cognitive biases in jury decisionmaking. His current project focuses on hate speech on college campuses.

Elliott Currie is the author of Confronting Crime: An American Challenge; Reckoning: Drugs, the Cities, and the American Future; Dope and Trouble: Portraits of Delinquent Youth; and, with Jerome H. Skolnick, Crisis in American Institutions and America's Problems: Social Issues and Public Policy. He received his doctorate in sociology from the University of California at Berkeley, where he teaches in the Legal Studies Program and is affiliated with the Center for the Study of Law and Society. He is Vice-Chair of the Milton Eisenhower Foundation in Washington, D.C., which supports innovative crime and delinquency prevention programs in the inner cities. He serves on the editorial board of the new international journal, Theoretical Criminology, and is currently completing a book on the state of crime and punishment in the United States.

John J. Donohue, Professor of Law and John A. Wilson Distinguished Faculty Scholar at Stanford Law School, has a Ph.D. in economics from Yale University and a law degree from Harvard Law School. From 1986 to 1995, he taught at Northwestern Law School and was a Research Fellow at the American Bar Foundation. He is currently a member of the Labor Studies section of the National Bureau of Economic Research. His broad focus is on the empirical evaluation of public policy measures, and in recent years he has written about the macro-policy choices involved in the criminal justice system.

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