Broken Contract? Changing Relationships between Americans and Their Government

By Stephen C. Craig | Go to book overview

tainly will not resolve their main concerns, but what other options are available? Whether it is through changing party control of Congress and of the state legislatures, supporting "outsider" (including Independent and minor-party) candidates, imposing term limits, acting as citizen legislators, or something else (see Craig 1993) -- we have reached the point at which, absent effective political leadership, people likely will continue doing whatever they can to keep elected officials on a short leash. Perhaps through a process of trial and error, some acceptable redress for our grievances will be found. And perhaps, along the way, more citizens will realize that they have been part of the problem all along (e.g., for expecting government to provide services that it cannot afford without additional tax revenues, for being ill informed on many issues, for rewarding candidates whose campaign appeals are simplistic and misleading) and act accordingly. However, politics does not come with the assurance of complete satisfaction or your money back. Unless and until our politicians decide to do the job they were elected to do, the democratic impulse will remain strong -- and the future will remain uncertain.


NOTES
1.
One example was the inability of House Republicans to pass a balanced-budget amendment that would have required a 60 percent vote in Congress to enact future tax increases.
2.
A study of registered voters by Greenberg Research, Inc. also found that, among Independents, the Republicans had an edge in "having people take greater responsibility" (44 percent to 19 percent), "making America prosperous" (39 percent to 19 percent), "insisting on moral standards, that people know right from wrong" (34 percent to 16 percent), "strengthening families" (31 percent to 20 percent), and "insisting on more discipline" (45 percent to 15 percent) -- though Democrats came out ahead in "respecting the ordinary person" (35 percent to 19 percent), "openness to change and innovation" (38 percent to 25 percent), "respecting people's individual freedom" (37 percent to 29 percent), "trying to make things better for people" (37 percent to 21 percent), and "understanding the financial pressures on people and families" (39 percent to 21 percent; Democratic Leadership Council 1994, pp. 49-50).
3.
Perhaps surprisingly, the same exit poll cited by Ladd ( 1995, p. 16) found the partisan composition of the electorate in 1994 (37 percent Democrat, 35 percent Republican, 29 percent Independent) to be virtually unchanged from what it had been two years earlier (37 percent, 35 percent, and 29 percent, respectively). The survey of registered voters conducted immediately after the election by Greenberg Research, Inc. produced a similar distribution: 36 percent Democrat (45 percent with leaners included), 34 percent Republican (45 percent with leaners), and 29 percent Independent (9 percent pure Independent) -- as well as statistically identical mean scores for the Republican Party (53 degrees, 50 among Independents) and the Democratic Party (52 degrees, 49 among Independents; see Democratic Leadership Council 1994, pp. 33, 35) on "feeling thermometer" questions comparable to those described in the Appendix to this book.
4.
They can derive less comfort from the considerable diversity that exists within their own ranks about how to respond to the changing political climate of the 1990s. President

-18-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Broken Contract? Changing Relationships between Americans and Their Government
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.