Control & Crisis in Colonial Kenya: The Dialectic of Domination

By Bruce Berman | Go to book overview

Bibliography

Primary sources

The primary sources for this study come from archives in London and Nairobi and a series of some 50 interviews with former administrators, technical officers and politicians in Britain and Kenya. The principal archival documentation is found in the Kenya National Archives (KNA), notably the files of the Chief Native Commissioner and the Office of the Chief Secretary; the departments (later, ministries) of African Affairs, Labour, Finance and Development, Commerce and Industry, and Agriculture; and various provinces and districts, particularly Central, Nyanza and Rift Valley provinces, and Kiambu, Fort Hall, Nyeri, Central Nyanza, Northern Nyanza and Machakos districts. The Kenya Government Library (KGL) was the source of most of the government publications listed below, as well as of a number of unpublished reports and manuscripts. In addition, other documentation was found in the papers of the University of Nairobi Library and a number of private collections of papers, for which citations are given in the text. In Britain, the principal archival source was the Public Record Office, (PRO), notably the CO533 series on Kenya.

The interviews were mostly undertaken on condition that the identity of informants would remain confidential, but that some general information about their position and experience in Kenya or Britain could be provided. This is contained in the number and lettered suffix attached to each interview. For administrators there is a three-digit number, the first digit indicates the rank of the official, 1 for junior officers (District Officers and District Commissioners) and 2 for senior officers (Provincial Commissioners or under secretaries or higher ranks in the Secretariat). The suffix indicates the primary sphere of service in Kenya: Provincial or Field Administration (F) or the Secretariat (S), or both (FS). Technical officers are indicated by a two-digit number and

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