Bull Run: Wall Street, the Democrats, and the New Politics of Personal Finance

By Daniel Gross | Go to book overview

7
The Republican Retreat

Presidential campaign announcements are generally tedious affairs. Surrounded by beaming family members, hangers-on, and rented friends, candidates ascend flag-bedecked podiums, recount their glorious careers, and describe, in painful detail, exactly how they will remedy every social ill befalling the nation, from Alzheimer's to the insidious zebra mussel. To compound matters, candidates in this era of omnimedia regard campaign kickoffs as branding events. To reinforce the fact they are running, then frequently announce more than once. On January 21, 1999, former Vice President Dan Quayle used the celebrity-friendly platform of Larry King Live to announce that he would

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Bull Run: Wall Street, the Democrats, and the New Politics of Personal Finance
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • 1 - The Democratization of Money 1
  • 2 - Public Employee Pension Funds 27
  • 3 - Labor and Intellectuals 55
  • 4 - Bill Clinton and Money 81
  • 5 - Arthur Levitt and the Sec 111
  • 6 - The New Moneycrats 137
  • 7 - The Republican Retreat 169
  • 8 - The New Politics of Personal Finance 191
  • Sources 213
  • Acknowledgments 219
  • Index 221
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