Early American Sheet Music: Its Lure and Its Lore, 1768-1889

By Harry Dichter; Elliott Shapiro | Go to book overview

Music of the American Revolution
(Hostilities 1775-1783)

Locating the music used during the American Revolution has been one of the most difficult researches made for this bibliography. In 1889 the late John Philip Sousa, then bandmaster of the United States Marine Band, was directed by the Navy Department to compile a collection entitled AIRS OF ALL LANDS (published 1890). In this compilation he states that the field music (fife and drum) of the Revolution consisted mainly of [MY] DOG AND GUN, ON THE ROAD TO BOSTON, RURAL FELICITY, WASHINGTON'S MARCH by Francis Hopkinson, and YANKEE DOODLE. Only the music of YANKEE DOODLEwas printed in Sousa's book.

We regret to state that there is no confirmation that any of the many compositions known as WASHINGTON'S MARCHwas actually used until 1784, or that Francis Hopkinson was the composer of such a march.

Inasmuch as the three tunes [MY] DOG AND GUN, ON THE ROAD To BOSTONand RURAL FELICITYare not available in any form, it has been deemed advisable to print the music for the benefit of those interested. Attention is called to the fact that Dr. Arne's contemporary song My DOG AND GUNis an entirely different composition than the field march.

It is worthy of note that although the tune of YANKEE DOODLEis enshrined in the hearts of the people of this great nation, the words are rarely sung. The explanation is that there are so many different lyrics that no one set of words can be called standard. We give the first couplets of five of the recognized versions in use from pre- Revolutionary days to the 1810's, but make no attempt to fix the chronological order. Note that the first set appeared in a very early broadside as YANKEE SONGand is known to musicologists as the CORN STALKS (Com Cobs) version. The fourth was written ca. 1797-1798, at the time of our impending war with France.

1. There was a man in our town
I pity his condition. . . .

____________________
We have just located the source of Sousa's information. See p. 33of Rev. Elias Nason's A MONOGRAM ON OUR NATIONAL SONG. 1869.

-7-

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Early American Sheet Music: Its Lure and Its Lore, 1768-1889
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Overture to Words and Music xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • First Editions xxiii
  • Part I Classified Listing of Early American Sheet Music xxxi
  • Presidents of the United States (1789-1941) 1
  • Music of the American Revolution (hostilities 1775-1783) 7
  • Early Music (1788-1810) 11
  • Early Patriotic and Historical Items (not Connected with Any War) 15
  • Yankee Doodle (in Chronological Order) 17
  • Hail Columbia (president's March) 21
  • Adams and Liberty ("Anacreon" Tune) 23
  • Undeclared War with France (hostilities 1798-1800) 24
  • George Washington 26
  • War with Tripoli (hostilities 1801-1805) 28
  • Early Indian Items 29
  • Early Negro Songs 30
  • War of 1812 (hostilities 1812-1815) 32
  • Star Spangled Banner (foreword) 34
  • Prior Uses of the "Anacreon" Tune 35
  • Star Spangled Banner Editions (the Imprints Are Given Exactly as Printed, in Each Case) 36
  • Songsters Containing Star Spangled Banner 38
  • Home Sweet Home 39
  • Lafayette 42
  • Military Items 45
  • My Country 'tis of Thee (america) 46
  • Early Comic Songs 47
  • Illustrated Negro Minstrel Songs (of the "Jim Crow" Type) 51
  • Non-Illustrated Negro Minstrel Songs 54
  • Ship Items 55
  • New York City Items 58
  • Political Items 60
  • Tobacco Items 63
  • Temperance Items 65
  • Abolition Items 67
  • Skating Items 68
  • Railroad Items 70
  • Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean 72
  • Indian Items 74
  • Dance Items 76
  • Fire Items 78
  • Mexican War (hostilities 1846-1847) 81
  • Jenny Lind Items 83
  • Early California Imprints 84
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin 85
  • Music Stores (the Name of the Publisher Precedes Each Title) 87
  • Stephen C. Foster First Editions 92
  • Stephen C. Foster Confederate Editions (description Condensed) 96
  • Express Company Items 98
  • College Views (the Name of the College Precedes Each Title) 99
  • College Songs 101
  • Later Comic Items 103
  • Telegraph and Cable Item 104
  • Dixie 105
  • Abraham Lincoln 109
  • Maryland My Maryland 113
  • Civil War Items (hostilities 1861-1865) 115
  • Confederate Items 119
  • Money Items 125
  • Stamp Items 128
  • Oil Items 129
  • Croquet Items 130
  • Trapeze and Aerial Items 131
  • Velocipede Items 132
  • Telephone Item 133
  • Harrigan and Hart Items 134
  • Electricity Item 136
  • Typewriter Item 137
  • Portraits on Music 138
  • Famous Songs (description Condensed) 139
  • Songs of Literary Interest (description Condensed) 156
  • Part II Directory of Early American Music Publishers 164
  • Part III Lithographers and Artists Working on American Sheet Music Before 1870 *
  • Bibliography 258
  • Part IV Illustrations 260
  • Index *
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