Early American Sheet Music: Its Lure and Its Lore, 1768-1889

By Harry Dichter; Elliott Shapiro | Go to book overview

Electricity Item

*ELECTRIC LIGHT MARCH. Swisher M. D.. Philadelphia. 1882

[p. 3.] Copyright 1882 by James F. Hey & Co. For the Piano: By Geo. E. Pabst. At head of title: To the Electric Light Companies of Philadelphia. 6 pp., pp. 2 and 6 blank. Figure 4 in 6 pointed star.

Illustration: Large electric light bulb in lamp. Name of composer is drawn on five lines of a music staff, in musical lettering.

-136-

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Early American Sheet Music: Its Lure and Its Lore, 1768-1889
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xii
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Overture to Words and Music xv
  • Introduction xvii
  • First Editions xxiii
  • Part I Classified Listing of Early American Sheet Music xxxi
  • Presidents of the United States (1789-1941) 1
  • Music of the American Revolution (hostilities 1775-1783) 7
  • Early Music (1788-1810) 11
  • Early Patriotic and Historical Items (not Connected with Any War) 15
  • Yankee Doodle (in Chronological Order) 17
  • Hail Columbia (president's March) 21
  • Adams and Liberty ("Anacreon" Tune) 23
  • Undeclared War with France (hostilities 1798-1800) 24
  • George Washington 26
  • War with Tripoli (hostilities 1801-1805) 28
  • Early Indian Items 29
  • Early Negro Songs 30
  • War of 1812 (hostilities 1812-1815) 32
  • Star Spangled Banner (foreword) 34
  • Prior Uses of the "Anacreon" Tune 35
  • Star Spangled Banner Editions (the Imprints Are Given Exactly as Printed, in Each Case) 36
  • Songsters Containing Star Spangled Banner 38
  • Home Sweet Home 39
  • Lafayette 42
  • Military Items 45
  • My Country 'tis of Thee (america) 46
  • Early Comic Songs 47
  • Illustrated Negro Minstrel Songs (of the "Jim Crow" Type) 51
  • Non-Illustrated Negro Minstrel Songs 54
  • Ship Items 55
  • New York City Items 58
  • Political Items 60
  • Tobacco Items 63
  • Temperance Items 65
  • Abolition Items 67
  • Skating Items 68
  • Railroad Items 70
  • Columbia, the Gem of the Ocean 72
  • Indian Items 74
  • Dance Items 76
  • Fire Items 78
  • Mexican War (hostilities 1846-1847) 81
  • Jenny Lind Items 83
  • Early California Imprints 84
  • Uncle Tom's Cabin 85
  • Music Stores (the Name of the Publisher Precedes Each Title) 87
  • Stephen C. Foster First Editions 92
  • Stephen C. Foster Confederate Editions (description Condensed) 96
  • Express Company Items 98
  • College Views (the Name of the College Precedes Each Title) 99
  • College Songs 101
  • Later Comic Items 103
  • Telegraph and Cable Item 104
  • Dixie 105
  • Abraham Lincoln 109
  • Maryland My Maryland 113
  • Civil War Items (hostilities 1861-1865) 115
  • Confederate Items 119
  • Money Items 125
  • Stamp Items 128
  • Oil Items 129
  • Croquet Items 130
  • Trapeze and Aerial Items 131
  • Velocipede Items 132
  • Telephone Item 133
  • Harrigan and Hart Items 134
  • Electricity Item 136
  • Typewriter Item 137
  • Portraits on Music 138
  • Famous Songs (description Condensed) 139
  • Songs of Literary Interest (description Condensed) 156
  • Part II Directory of Early American Music Publishers 164
  • Part III Lithographers and Artists Working on American Sheet Music Before 1870 *
  • Bibliography 258
  • Part IV Illustrations 260
  • Index *
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