Early American Sheet Music: Its Lure and Its Lore, 1768-1889

By Harry Dichter; Elliott Shapiro | Go to book overview

Portraits on Music

This phase of music collecting will be of special interest to print collectors.

In the earlier days of our country it was the custom of publishers to issue music bearing fine engravings or lithographs of singers, actors and actresses, composers, authors, persons of affairs--and even race-horses.

We have listed some of these under "Presidents of the United States," "Political Items," "Jenny Lind," etc., etc., but this does not begin to cover this very wide and interesting field. We deem it best to cover the subject generally, with a suggestion that all portraits on music be collected. We give a few examples as to what may be found.

Actors and Actresses: Sara Bernhardt; Edwin Booth; Edwin Forrest; Lester Wallack (theatrical manager), etc.

Army Officers: Gen. Winfield Scott; Gen. Robert E. Lee; Gen. "Stonewall" Jackson; also officers of the Mexican and Civil Wars.

Authors: Longfellow; Dickens, etc.

Cabinet Member: Gideon Wells.

Chief Justice: Roger Taney.

Circus Performers: Herr Cline ( 1828); Blondin (crossed Niagara Falls on a tight-rope).

Composers: Beethoven; Chopin; Gottschalk; Josef Hoffmann; Mendelssohn; Offenbach; Paderewski; Paganini; Rubinstein; Strauss; Von Bulow; Wagner; Wm. Vincent Wallace; Weber.

Magicians: Professor Anderson; Hermann.

Mesmerists: Professor Ossian E. Dodge.

Midgets: Tom Thumb; Minnie Warren (Mrs. Tom Thumb); Dolly Dot; Commodore Foote.

Notables: Cyrus W. Field; Horace Greeley; Thomas Scott (President of the Pennsylvania R. R.).

Royalty: Queen Victoria; Napoleon Bonaparte; Prince Albert; Louis Napoleon.

Singers: Mme. Anna Bishop; Adelaide Neilson; Adelina Patti; Parepa Rosa; Mme. Zelda Seguin; Mme. Henrietta Sontag.

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