Political Science: The State of the Discipline II

By Ada W. Finifter | Go to book overview

Fourth, this chapter has tried to disentangle two dimensions of the perennial institutionalization issue in the study of political executives. It has identified two, rather than one, gearbox problems. The first of these concerns the political executives who make up an administration or government and their relations with the standing bureaucracy. We found abundant evidence that the institutionalization of the latter works a diminished effect as chief executives and their colleagues heighten efforts to reassert political control. Yet, the tug of war between an administration/government and the bureaucracy forms simply one part of the policy competence equation. Institutionalization inevitably rears its ugly head. And, in the case of the second gearbox problem, it involves the increased complexity, unwieldiness, and even willfulness of the cadre of presidents' and prime ministers' men and women who make up an administration or government. Nobody -- least of all presidents or prime ministers -- can assume that just because two or more gather in a chief executive's name that they actually will work in harmony.

Finally, this chapter attempted to demonstrate the continued utility of examining presidents' and prime ministers' personalities as critical factors contributing to their management style and performance. The case presented here places a strong emphasis on the special salience of the issue to presidential systems -- owing, of course, to their monocratic nature. However, personality has worked distinctive effects in parliamentary systems. This assessment readily admits that inclusion of personality in analyses presents difficult problems of operationalization. However, we can lull ourselves into some seriously error-prone analyses if we rule out personality as a factor altogether or construe it as an optional add-on.


Bibliography

Aberbach, Joel D., Robert A. Putnam, and Bert A. Rockman. 1981. Bureaucrats and Politicians in Western Democracies. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

Aberbach, Joel D. 1991. "The President and the Executive Branch." In The Bush Administration: First Appraisals, ed. Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.

Alchain, A. A., and S. Woodward. 1987. "Reflections on the Theory of the Firm." Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics 143:110-36.

Allison, Graham T. 1971. The Essence of Decision: Explaining the Cuban Missile Crisis. Boston: Little, Brown.

Anson, Stan. 1991. Hawke: An Emotional Life. Ringwood, Victoria: Penguin.

Aucoin, Peter. 1986. "Organizing Change in the Machinery of Canadian Government." Canadian Journal of Political Science 14:3-17.

Aucoin, Peter. 1988. "The Mulroney Government: Priorities, Positional Policy and Power." In Canada Under Mulroney: An End of Term Report, ed. A. B. Gollner and D. Salee. Montreal: Vehicule.

Aucoin, Peter. 1989. "Contraction, Managerialism and Decentralization in Canadian Government." Governance 1:144-161.

Aucoin, Peter. 1990a. "Administrative Reform in Public Management: Paradigms, Principles, Paradoxes and Pendulums." Governance 3:115-137.

Aucoin, Peter. 1990b. "Comment: Assessing Managerial Reforms." Governance 3:197-204.

Barber, James David. 1972. The Presidential Character: Predicting Performance in the White House. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Barber, James David. 1977. "Comment: Qualls's Nonsensical Analysis of Nonexistent Works." American Political Science Review 71:212-225.

Berman, Larry, and Bruce W. Jentleson. 1991. "Bush and the Post-Cold War Worlds: New Challenges for American Leadership." In The Bush Administration: First Appraisals, ed. Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.

Berry, Phyllis. 1989. "The Organization and Influence of the Chancellory during the Schmidt and Kohl Chancellorships." Governance 2:339-355.

Borins, Sanford F. 1982. "Ottawa's Expenditure 'Envelopes': Workable Rationality at Last?" In How Ottawa Spends Your Tax Dollars: National Policy and Economic Development, ed. G. Bruce Doern . Ottawa: Carleton University Press.

Boston, Jonathan. 1987. "Transforming New Zealand's Public Sector: Labour's Quest for Improving Efficiency and Accountability." Public Administration 65:423-442.

Buchanan, James M., and Gordon Tullock. 1962. The Calculus of Consent. Logical Foundations of Constitutional Democracy. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press.

Burns, James MacGregor. 1963. The Deadlock of Democracy: Four- Party Politics in America. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice- Hall.

Campbell, Colin. 1980. "Political Leadership In Canada: Pierre Elliott Trudeau and the Ottawa Model." In Presidents and Prime Ministers, ed. Richard Rose and Ezra Suleiman. Washington: American Enterprise Institution.

Campbell, Colin. 1983. Governments Under Stress: Political Executives and Key Bureaucrats in Washington, London and Ottawa. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.

Campbell, Colin. 1985. "Cabinet Committees in Canada: Pressures and Dysfunctions Stemming from the Representational Imperative." In Unlocking the Cabinet: Cabinet Structures in Comparative Perspective, ed. Thomas T. Mackie and Brian Hogwood . London: Sage.

Campbell, Colin. 1986. Managing the Presidency: Carter, Reagan and the Search for Executive Harmony. Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Campbell, Colin. 1988. "Mulroney's Broker Politics: The Ultimate in Politicized Incompetence?" In Canada Under Mulroney: An End of Term Report, ed. A. B. Gollner and D. Salee. Montreal: Vehicule.

Campbell, Colin. 1991. "The White House and Presidency under the 'Let's Deal" President." In The Bush Administration: First Appraisals, ed. Colin Campbell and Bert A. Rockman. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.

Campbell, Colin, and Margaret Jane Wyszomirski. 1991. "Introduction." In Executive Leadership in Anglo-American Systems, ed. Colin Campbell and Margaret Jane Wyszomirski . Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press.

Campbell, Colin, and Bert A. Rockman, eds. 1991. The Bush Administration: First Appraisals. Chatham, NJ: Chatham House.

-403-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Political Science: The State of the Discipline II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Table of Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Theory and Method 1
  • 1: Texts and Canons: The Status of the "Great Books" in Political Theory 3
  • Conclusion 21
  • Notes 22
  • Bibliography 23
  • 2: Political Theory in the 1980s: Perplexity Amidst Diversity 27
  • Notes 43
  • Bibliography 43
  • Additional Bibliography 46
  • 3: Feminist Challenges to Political Science 55
  • Notes 72
  • Bibliography 73
  • 4: Formal Rational Choice Theory: A Cumulative Science of Politics 77
  • Concluding Comments 97
  • Notes 98
  • Bibliography 101
  • 5: The Comparative Method 105
  • Conclusion 116
  • Notes 117
  • Bibliography 117
  • 6: The State of Quantitative Political Methodology 121
  • Conclusion 148
  • Notes 148
  • Bibliography 150
  • Political Processes and Individual Political Behavior 161
  • 7: Comparative Political Parties: Research and Theory 163
  • Conclusion 183
  • Notes 184
  • Bibliography 185
  • 8: The Not So Simple Act of Voting 193
  • Notes 213
  • Bibliography 214
  • 9: The New Look in Public Opinion Research 219
  • Notes 240
  • Bibliography 240
  • 10: Expanding Disciplinary Boundaries 247
  • Conclusion 269
  • Notes 271
  • Bibliography 271
  • 11: Citizens, Contexts, and Politics 281
  • Conclusion: Putting the Puzzle Back Together 299
  • Bibliography 300
  • 12: Political Communication 305
  • Conclusions 323
  • Bibliography 324
  • Political Institutions of the State 333
  • 13: Legislatures: Individual Purpose and Institutional Performance 335
  • Conclusions: Behavior, Institutions, and Theory 354
  • Notes 357
  • Bibliography 357
  • 14: Public Law and Judicial Politics 365
  • 15: Political Executives and Their Officials 383
  • Conclusion 402
  • Bibliography 403
  • 16: Public Administration: The State of the Field 407
  • Notes 423
  • Bibliography 424
  • Nations and Their Relationships 429
  • 17: Comparative Politics 431
  • Conclusion 443
  • Notes 444
  • Bibliography 446
  • 18: Global Political Economy 451
  • Conclusion 474
  • Notes 476
  • Bibliography 477
  • Conclusions 483
  • Conclusions 503
  • Notes 504
  • Bibliography 505
  • Appendix 511
  • Contributors 513
  • Index of Cited Authors 517
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 538

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.