The Concordat of 1801: A Study of the Problem of Nationalism in the Relations of Church and State

By Henry H. Walsh | Go to book overview

INDEX
Agincourt, battle of, referred to, 17
Alfred the Great, referred to, 141
Anagni, 16
Archiepiscopal Council, in Paris, 151, 156
Aristotle, referred to, 73
Arnaud, A. d', referred to, 227
Artois, Comte d', and Maury, 105; reaction under, 236
Astros, Cardinal d', referred to, 61; and Portalis, 77; leadership of, 120; frustrated Napoleon's scheme to administer vacant dioceses, 171, 173; career of, 178- 198, 229, 235, 237
Augustus, empire of, referred to, 70; emperor, referred to, 195
Aulard, A., quoted, on revolutionary patriotism, 13-14; on the Convention, 24; on the men of the Enlightenment, 25; on the uprising in La Vendee, 26; on the Theophilanthropist church, 28; on revival of religious services, 29, on the Jacobins, 127
Barruel, Abbé, his defiance of the Pope, 119- 120
Basle, Council of, referred to, 17- 18
Beaumarchais, referred to, 77
Bellarmine, quoted, 20
Belloy, Cardinal de, death of, 184
Benedictines, referred to, 227
Bernier, Abbé, agent of French government to treat with representatives of the Holy See, 42- 43; his plea for the forced resignations of the bishops of the old régime, 43-44; a dubious act on the part of, 44-45; his letter of warning to Consalvi, 46; sends an ultimatum to Cacault, 47; on the Pope's objection to divorce clauses in the Fifth Project. 47- 48; on the Papal bull proclaiming the Concordat, 53-54
Bismarck, and integral nationalism, 240
Blanchardists, their defiance of Pius VII, 117-122
Bodley, J. E. C., quoted, 164
Boisgelin, Mgr. de, friend of d'Astros, 181
Bonaparte, Napoleon, see Napoleon I
Boniface VIII, referred to, 15,
Bossuet, J. B., referred to, 121, 217; quoted, 164; de Maistre on, 229-230
Boulay de la Meurthe, on the Constitutionals and the non-Jurors, 31, 34-36; referred to, 39; defends First Consul, 40; on the Organic Articles, 56; on Grégoire, 132
Bourbons, The, referred to, 96; believers in the divine right of, 98; claims of, 101; and Maury, 110, 114; guardians of Gallican rights, 112; cause of, abandoned by Maury, 116; Napoleon's imitation or, 164-165; de Maistre on, 211, 215, 217, 223; partisans of, 231, 236
Briand, A., and the Law of Separation, 242
Bryce, J., quoted, 15
Bury, J. B., quoted on the Papacy, 200-202
Cacault, French agent at Rome, 45-46; suggested that Consalvi negotiate in Paris, 47; on Grégoire, 123-124, 135-130, 140
Canonical institution, reserved to the Pope, 55; Pius VIII's refusal of, 169-175,185-186: d'Astros on, 188
Canossa, referred to, 11, 16; and Napoleon, 179
Capara, Cardinal, legate a latere for the Roman See in Paris, 54, 179, 184

-251-

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The Concordat of 1801: A Study of the Problem of Nationalism in the Relations of Church and State
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 1
  • Preface 5
  • Contents 7
  • Introduction 11
  • Chapter I - On the Eve of the Concordat 23
  • Chapter II - The Negotiations for the Concordat 39
  • Chapter III - Chateaubriand 62
  • Chapter IV - Jean-Etienne Portalis 76
  • Chapter V - Jean Siffrein Maury 100
  • Chapter VI - Henri GrÉgoire 123
  • Chapter VII - Jacques-AndrÉ Emery 146
  • Chapter VIII - Paul-ThÉrÈse-David D'Astros 178
  • Chapter IX - Joseph De Maistre 199
  • Chapter X - Conclusion 233
  • Bibliography 247
  • Index 251
  • Vita 260
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