Glossary
Arapaho -- a Plains tribe of Algonkian family, living when first encountered in eastern Colorado and southeastern Wyoming
Arikara-- a semi-sedentary tribe of Caddoan family, living near the Mandan and Hidatsa on the upper Missouri, and linguistically close relatives of the Pawnee
Assiniboine -- politically independent northern offshoot of Dakota, living in intimate contact with the Cree in western Canada and northernmost Montana
beaming tool -- two-handled tool for currying hides
Blackfoot -- a confederacy of three closely related tribes of Algonkian family, living in southern Alberta and northwestern Montana
bundle -- see medicine bundle
Cheyenne -- a nomadic Plains tribe of the Algonkian family, found in the Black Hills of South Dakota by Lewis and Clark, but originally sedentary in Minnesota
chips -- droppings, especially of the buffalo
clan -- a social unit into which a person is born by inheriting the affiliation of either parent according to the tribal rule of descent; thus, Crow clans are matrilineal because children belong to their mother's clan, while Omaha clans are patrilineal because all children belong to their father's clan
coulée -- the bed of a stream, even if dry, provided the sides are inclined; Western American term of French origin
coup -- the war exploit of touching the enemy with the hand or something held in the hand; derived from the French word for "blow"
Dakota -- branch of the Siouan family, including the Western Dakota (Teton), who were naturally those in intimate contact with the Crow
exogamy -- the rule that one must marry outside of one's group, especially one's clan
Gros Ventre -- a Plains tribe of the Algonkian family, a northern offshoot of the Arapaho subsequently closely affiliated with the Blackfoot. The name has sometimes been applied also to the quite distinct Hidatsa, but is no longer so used scientifically
hand-game -- gambling game found by Culin among 81 tribes of western North America. It is characterized by the guessing of which hand contains a lot, the lots most frequently being pairs of bone cylinders, and the object generally being to point out the unmarked member of a pair
Hidatsa -- a semi-sedentary tribe of Siouan family, living on the upper Missouri, in what is now North Dakota; closest relative of the Crow
levitate -- the custom of a man's inheriting a brother's (or equivalent male kinsman's) widow
Mandan -- semi-sedentary Siouan tribe of upper Missouri in present North Dakota, culturally very close to neighboring Hidatsa, though linguistically only remotely related

-343-

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The Crow Indians
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Illustrations ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • I - Tribal Organization 3
  • II - Kinship and Affnity 18
  • III - From Cradle to Grave 33
  • IV - The Workaday World 72
  • V - Literature 104
  • VI - Selected Tales 119
  • VII - Old Woman's Grandchild 134
  • VIII - Twined-Tail 158
  • IX - Club Life 172
  • X - War 215
  • XI - Religion 237
  • XII - Rites and Festivals 256
  • XIII - The Bear Song Dance 264
  • XIV - The Sacred Pipe Dance 269
  • XV - The Tobacco Society 274
  • XVI - The Sun Dance 297
  • XVII - World-View 327
  • Appendix I - Sources 335
  • Appendix II - Clan Names 340
  • Glossary 343
  • Index 345
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