Building the Invisible Orphanage: A Prehistory of the American Welfare System

By Matthew A. Crenson | Go to book overview

Illustrations
James E. West, organizer of the White House conference for the Care of Dependent Children16
Charles Loring Brace, founder of the New York Children's Aid Society66
Rabbi Samuel Wolfenstein, superintendent of the Cleveland Jewish Orphan Asylum108
A party of orphan train passengers about to set out from the New York Juvenile Asylum126
Faculty, Minnesota State Public School at Owatonna, ca. 1886, with Superintendent Galen Merrill159
Buildings and grounds of the Minnesota State Public School, Owatonna166
Elizabeth Cabot Putnam, organizer of the Massachusetts Auxiliary Visitors and Trustee of the Monson State Primary School178
Orphan train riders, en route to new homes, at a stop in Kansas220
Charles W. Birtwell, General Secretary of the Boston Children's Aid Society234
New arrivals at the Boston Home for Catholic Children323

-ix-

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Building the Invisible Orphanage: A Prehistory of the American Welfare System
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1 - The Decline of the Orphanage and the Invention of Welfare 7
  • 2 - The Institutional Inclination 37
  • 3 - Two Dimensions of Institutional Change 61
  • 4 - Institutional Self-Doubt and Internal Reform 92
  • 5 - From Orphanage to Home 113
  • 6 - The Orphanage Reaches Outward 147
  • 7 - "The Unwalled Institution of the State" 171
  • 8 - The Perils of Placing Out 202
  • 9 - "The Experiment of Having No Home" 227
  • 10 - Mobilizing for Mothers' Pensions 246
  • 11 - Religious Wars 284
  • Conclusion: An End to the Orphanage 306
  • Notes 333
  • Index 375
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