Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

No. 5 is the apostrophe. This is reserved for the conclusion of homilies. A good example occurred at Belem. John Paul turned toward the statue of Our Lady and addressed the Mother of God. "Mary, you are the second Eve There was transition from preaching to praying.

6. Here the rhetorical device also contains a psychological ploy. It consists in a quotation from the very person or persons whom he is addressing. It is most commonly used with bishops who feel gratified, flattered and -- it must be admitted -- hoist with their own petard.

In Brazil, John Paul used this device in his address to President Joao Figueiredo. If reforms are to be realized, then mentalities have to be changed, he told the president, adding: "always enlightened by 'the certainty that man is at the center of our concerns and responsibilities,' as you wrote to me recently."

It was a shrewd move. The president could hardly object to having his own words quoted back at him. But now he was being forced to consider the further implications of what may have been no more than a rhetorical flourish. Since the centrality of a man (the human person) was the theme of the entire visit, it was a perfectly fair procedure.

John Paul's rhetorical style derives from Cicero and Bossuet -- and, no doubt, Piotr Skarga, the 18th century Polish preacher. It is a style that has largely vanished from the Anglo-Saxon world where television demands a different kind of intimacy and "I'd just like to say a few words" is the only form of public discourse left. But it seems to work in Latin countries. □


16
Pope foresees growing battle between good and evil.

( January 9, 1981) As Pope John Paul peers into the future, he sees not the next decade but the next 20 years. The year 2000 fascinates him like the eye of the basilisk. What is going to happen in this period is an intensification of the age-old struggle between good and

-55-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pope John Paul II and the Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.