Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

The third astonishing feature of the Schotte report is that although "fidelity to the tradition of the church and the teaching of John Paul II" is presented as the criterion of sound doctrine, what John Paul II's teaching is on the matter is nowhere made clear.

What makes this -- evidently premeditated -- absence of the pope from the discussion even more astonishing is that his own position was discussed and regarded as of vital importance. So the absurd situation was reached in which Cardinal Agostino Casaroli filled the gap by offering "a personal commentary" on the June 11, 1982, U.N. message.

"He did so," the Schotte report explains, "not as an authorized interpreter of the Holy Father's statement, but on the basis of his knowledge of the text and context of that message." So he was not wiser than anyone else. He was placed in the unenviable position of having to "deduce" what papal teaching might be and hedged it with cautious qualifications: "this was doubtless in the thought of the Holy Father," etc.

This seems a rather odd way of doing things. It is as though John Paul set the bishops a difficult riddle, then left them to speculate about what it might mean. No doubt it will be said this was done to leave the bishops free to make up their own minds.

But no such inhibitions were apparent in the Dutch synod. In any case, although the U.S. bishops were not worsted in arguments -- they stated their case well, and the countercase was merely set in parallel against it -- they then returned home to modify their pastoral according to what they had heard in Rome.

So the secret meeting in Rome raised without resolving questions on the morality of nuclear war. But its deeper significance is ecclesiological. What price collegiality now? And how can doctrine develop? □


28
'Spiritual defiance' infuses pope's Poland visit

( July 1, 1983) Just before the papal visit to Poland, Cardinal Józef Glemp gave an interview to an Italian weekly, Il Sabato. He said

-124-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Pope John Paul II and the Church
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 312

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.