Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

be one somewhere else, but here we get on well with our moral theologians.

But Hume was named by Pope Paul VI. It does nothing for episcopal morale today to know that bishops are being appointed for their readiness to toe the most rigid party line. As for theologians, whose task is to think for the church as well as with it, credibility is not served by keeping men like Hans Küng, Leonardo Boff or Charles Curran in intellectual limbo.

They have shown their loyalty in adversity. They differ on noninfallible questions. They have no other home but the church. An amnesty would be in order. But the message of Veritatis Splendor is that it will have to wait for the next pontificate. Meantime, vigilance will be increased rather than diminished.

Two quotations spring to mind. Aldous Huxley: "You can do anything with bayonets -- except sit upon them." And Benedictine Christopher Butler, formerly abbot of Downside Abbey and auxiliary bishop of Westminster: "An authority that does not address the conscience, will soon cease to be an authority."


60
Pope gives interview, decries capitalism

An interview with Pope John Paul II, which appeared in recent editions of La Stampa, Liberation, and the Guardian, is only the second substantial interview with the pope. It was conducted by an old friend, Jas Gawronski, a Polish émigré who for many years was a Moscow correspondent for RAI (Italian television).

Only two questions touched on personal matters. The pope does not keep a diary ("I have other things to do") and, unlike Pope Paul VI, never feels lonely: "Perhaps I have another temperament, and besides I always have near me people who are close to me and are my friends. Neither do I make the decisions alone. I work collegially with the episcopates, with the curia." Note the two senses of "collegiality."

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