Pope John Paul II and the Church

By Peter Hebblethwaite | Go to book overview

You wouldn't think it from this treatment. It turns prayer into a carefully controlled gas jet rather than an all-consuming fire of the Spirit. It prefers conformity to empowering and responsibility.

I notice that in the new and revised edition of Fr. Richard McBrien's Catholicism, a totally new Chapter 29 ("Worship, Liturgy, Prayer and Devotions") covers much the same ground as the CCC.

I know which work I would recommend to someone looking for guidance on prayer. Or anything else for that matter. An alert mind always does better than a committee.


64
Catholics try to digest papal bombshell

( July 1, 1994) Vatican bombshells are often timed to coincide with the start of the summer vacation, when the opposition is unable to organize. So it was with Humanae Vitae in 1968. So it is now with Sacerdotalis Ordinatio, the apostolic letter of Pope John Paul II declaring that priestly ordination is for men (males) only.

The most frank and brutal response has been that of Ttibingen, Germany, canon lawyer Norbert Greinacher. He calls on the pope to resign on the grounds that he has "separated himself from the faith of the church." He describes the letter as "theological nonsense."

His bishop, Walter Kasper, former professor of theology at Tübingen, alleged that, on the contrary, it was Greinacher who was separating himself from the faith of the church. Greinacher replies that he has statements up to January 1993 in which Kasper accepted that "there is no theological argument against women's ordination."

Down under in Australia, Dominican Fr. Philip Kennedy, who has a doctorate in theology from the Catholic University of Fribourg in Switzerland, wrote an article in the Melbourne daily, Herald Sun.

" Thomas Aquinas wrote," says Kennedy, "that when it came to the truth, it did not matter who was speaking. I am no Aquinas, but having carefully studied the pope's latest letter, I think his argument is invalid and does not square with the historical evidence."

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