Sexual Health for Men: The Complete Guide

By Richard F. Spark | Go to book overview

2
What Do Men Want?

How do you really know what is good for you? Even if it comes with a money-back guarantee, does every product claiming to make a man bigger, stronger, or sexier really work? Do those in the advertising business think of all men as chumps who are willing to shell out cash to fulfill their sexual fantasies? In this chapter you will learn how much reliance to place on claims, which are basically marketing devices, hearsay evidence, anecdotes, testimonials, the power of the placebo, and the value of placebo-controlled clinical trials.

What do men want?

To be better, have more, and not be frightened.

It is as simple as that.

But be better how, have more what, and what on earth could possibly frighten a man?

Let's start with better.

No matter what our age or circumstances, we men are forever striving to be better -- stronger, faster, smarter, richer, sexier. Maybe it is the competitive spirit instilled in all of us from the time we were little boys. As youngsters we pester our parents to buy the "Breakfast of Champions," hoping that if we wolf down enough cereal flakes each morning we will turn into remarkable athletes. Some do, but most don't.

Yet we never seem to outgrow our little boy's naïveté and remain steadfast in the belief that there will always be something on the shelf that will help improve our virile profile. The only difference is that as grown-ups we do our own shopping, if not for cereal then for any other product to help us be better men.

Consider for example, our desire for more.

When we learn that there is an item called the "Stud Pill for Men)" which is said to be "safe . . . proven . . . FDA legal . . . increases serum testosterone levels . . . reverses male aging" and also "burns fat . . . builds muscle . . . boosts strength, energy and sex drive" our natural reaction is "Wow!"

The "Stud Pill for Men" is the brainchild of Wayne Josephson, who, according to a story in the Wall Street Journal ( January 27, 1999), left his job

-5-

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