Sexual Health for Men: The Complete Guide

By Richard F. Spark | Go to book overview

15
Dihydrotestosterone (DHT): The Androgen for the Twenty-First Century?

Testosterone may not be numero uno among male hormones for long. One of the by-products of testosterone metabolism, a hormone called dihydrotestosterone (DHT), is already attracting increased attention. Until recently, doctors always thought of DHT as a troublemaker, since it is the hormone most commonly accused as the culprit responsible for two of men's nagging concerns -- balding and prostate gland enlargement.


HOW DOES DHT CAUSE BALDING AND PROSTATE GLAND ENLARGEMENT?
DHT can only provoke balding or encourage prostate enlargement in the proper setting. When DHT accumulates within a man's prostate, his prostate gland starts to grow. Similarly, a man requires a generous supply of DHT funneled into his scalp hair follicle to provoke hair loss. How does this happen?Your prostate gland and hair follicle are equipped to pull testosterone from your bloodstream and then alter it. A unique enzyme called 5-alpha reductase can convert testosterone to DHT. The two absolute prerequisites for balding and prostate gland enlargement are that:
1. Testosterone gets siphoned out of your bloodstream and incorporated into your prostate gland or hair follicle.
2. The 5-alpha reductase enzyme transforms the trapped testosterone to dihydrotestosterone.

Now doctors have known about the importance of testosterone for centuries. Hippocrates taught that "Women and eunuchs do not take the gout or become bald."

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sexual Health for Men: The Complete Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 440

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.