PLAYWRITING FOR PROFIT

BY ARTHUR EDWIN KROWS AUTHOR OF "PLAY PRODUCTION IN AMERICA" "EQUIPMENT FOR STAGE PRODUCTION," ETC.

Illustrated with 20 workshop pages provided especially for this book by well-known dramatists and producers

LONGMANS, GREEN AND CO.

NEW YORK · LONDON · TORONTO

1928

-v-

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Playwriting for Profit
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • David Belasco Writing a Play iv
  • Title Page v
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xvii
  • Part One Ways and Means 1
  • Chapter I the Know-How 1
  • Chapter II the Art of Playmaking 15
  • Chapter III the Stage Way 26
  • Part Two Audience Demands 34
  • Chapter IV the Audience Decides 34
  • Chapter V a Philosophy of Pleasure 43
  • Chapter VI the Matter of Length 52
  • Chapter VII Purpose 58
  • Part Three the Play Idea 68
  • Chapter VIII the Struggle of Wills 68
  • Chapter IX the Essentials 76
  • Chapter X Proposition: the Touchstone 90
  • Part Four Plot 103
  • Chapter XI the "Must" Scenes 103
  • Chapter XII Sequence of Facts 116
  • Chapter XIII the Forward Movement 121
  • Part Five the Sequence 128
  • Chapter XIV the Long Step 128
  • Chapter XV Continuous Action 138
  • Chapter XVI the Literature of Power 149
  • Part Six Sustained Interest 156
  • Chapter XVII Retardation 156
  • Chapter XVIII Compactness 166
  • Chapter XIX the Interlocking Chain 178
  • Part Seven Detailed Action 190
  • Chapter XX Demonstration 190
  • Chapter XXI Translation of Facts 203
  • Chapter XXII Business 209
  • Chapter XXIII Proportion 220
  • Part Eight Making Ready 227
  • Chapter XXIV the Play Begins 227
  • Chapter XXV What Happened Before 237
  • Chapter XXVI Preparation 244
  • Part Nine Characterization 259
  • Chapter XXVII Puppets 259
  • Chapter XXVIII Portraits from Life 270
  • Chapter XXIX the Persons of the Play 284
  • Chapter XXX on Parade 299
  • Part Ten Dialogue 314
  • Chapter XXXI the Blessing of Words 314
  • Chapter XXXII the Mechanics of Dialogue 326
  • Chapter XXXIII Living Speech 347
  • Chapter XXXIV He Says and She Says 363
  • Chapter XXXV Monologues 379
  • Part Eleven Production 393
  • Chapter XXXVI Inspection 393
  • Chapter XXXVII the Theater 414
  • Chapter XXXVIII Title and Kind 428
  • Chapter Xxxix Sale 442
  • Part Twelve the Next Play 461
  • Chapter XL the World of Ideas 461
  • Chapter XLI What the Public Wants 476
  • Chapter XLII the Invention of Plots 491
  • Chapter XLIII Every Man for Himself 504
  • Chapter XLIV Some Other Books to Read 514
  • Index 523
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