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American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

LOCATION SOURCES

Library of Congress, many other libraries (especially public). Available in microform.


Publication History

MAGAZINE TITLE AND TITLE CHANGES

"Americana", 1973-present.


VOLUME AND ISSUE DATA

Vols. 1-15, March 1973-present. Bimonthly (six issues a year).


PUBLISHER AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION

American Heritage Society: Paul Gottlieb, 1973-1975; Marjorie C. Dyer, 1975- 1976; Rhett Austell, 1976-1978; Tim Hill, 1979. Americana Magazine, Inc.: Jack Armstrong, 1979-present. New York, New York.


EDITORS

Peter Andrews, 1973-1974; Michael Durham, 1974-1986; Sandra J. Wilmot, 1986-present.


CIRCULATION

357,700 paid, 3,300 nonpaid.

David R. Kohut

APPAREL ARTS. See GQ: GENTLEMAN'S QUARTERLY


APPLETON'S JOURNAL

In the latter part of the nineteenth century, it was not uncommon for American book publishers to branch out into magazine publishing as a means of increasing their profits. One of the publishers who did this was D. Appleton and Company, who, in 1869, brought out a general-interest magazine entitled "Appleton's Journal of Literature", "Science and Art". Primarily a New York-oriented magazine, Appleton's enlightened the public on those subjects included in the title and advertised the publisher's latest books as well.

The magazine's mission was outlined by editor Edward Youmans in the first issue, dated 3 April 1869. Appleton's would focus on literature, science, art, and education. While it would impart "valuable information upon subjects of public importance," 1 ordinary news was to be omitted from its pages.

During its twelve-year existence, Appleton's contained a wide variety of features. In any given issue, the reader might find poetry, essays, a chapter of a serialized novel, travel pieces, criticism of drama or art, brief articles on science, or a biographical sketch. Topics covered in articles were many and varied, including education, women, health concerns, current events, and manners. The tone of many of the pieces is similar to much popular writing of the time, genteel almost in the extreme. Dorothy Parker once commented of a book written in

-23-

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