American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview
Save to active project

Eclectic appeared in a monthly edition along with the weekly issue of Living Age.

In 1919, after the Atlantic Monthly Company purchased Living Age, Atlantic's president, Ellery Sedgwick, edited the magazine for one year, and then was succeeded by Victor S. Clark. During Clark's editorship from 1920 to 1928, the journal extended its field to include translations from periodical sources in more European countries, South America, and the Far East. The 1920 edition of Living Age lists contributions from Action française, Deutsche Allgemeine, Giornale d'Italia, Heraldo de Madrid, Internationale communiste, Japan Advertiser, Moscow Pravda, and Statist, among many others. In 1926, the magazine became a semimonthly.

An independent corporation in New York, the World Topics Corporation, purchased the magazine in 1928, and that year, Living Age appeared in a new and enlarged format as an illustrated monthly edited by John Bakeless, a former assistant of Clark's. In 1929, the magazine was changed again to a semimonthly and a smaller format without illustrations, with Quincy Howe as editor. Throughout the 1930s, the magazine continued to broaden its scope of sources and selection of news and authors. A cosmopolitan outlook on world affairs was featured through such departments as War and Peace, The World Over, and As Others See Us. Articles by and about celebrated writers and artists were highlighted: Thomas Mann, Walter De la Mare, Pio Baroja, Hilaire Belloc, Luigi Pirandello, Pablo Picasso, and J. B. Priestley. In 1938, Joseph Hilton Smyth, a journalist and free-lance writer, bought the Living Age, and published and edited the magazine until its abrupt demise in 1941. In 1942, Smyth, along with Irvine Harvey Williams, who had acted as president of the Living Age Corporation, and Walter G. Matheson, a staff writer, were investigated by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. All three were charged with being propaganda agents for Japan when investigations revealed that the Japanese government had provided the money for Smyth's purchase of Living Age in 1938, and had underwritten publication losses each month in consideration for propaganda articles to be featured in each month's issue. It was an ignominious and ironic ending for a publication that its founder, Littell, had envisioned as a bulwark against "what is bad in taste and vicious in morals." 4


Notes
1.
Frank Luther Mott, A History of American Magazines. Vol. 1: 1741-1850 ( New York: D. Appleton and Company, 1930), p. 748.
2.
Eliakim Littell, "Prospectus," quoted in Ninety Years On, Living Age 346 ( 1934):200.
3.
Ibid.
4.
Ibid.

-224-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Mass-Market Magazines
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 616

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?