American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

Steinberg, Sylvia. "The Many Children of Parents' Magazine." Publishers Weekly, 19 July 1976, pp. 83-84.


INDEX SOURCES

Readers' Guide to Periodical Literature ( 1929-present); Education Index ( 1929- 1949); Abridged Readers' Guide; Book Review Index; Biography Index. By publisher.


LOCATION SOURCES

Library of Congress; many other libraries. Available in microform.


Publication History

MAGAZINE TITLE AND TITLE CHANGES

Children: The Magazine for Parents, October 1926-January 1929; Children: The Parents' Magazine, February 1929-July 1929; The Parents' Magazine, August 1929-December 1965; Parents' Magazine and Better Homemaking, January 1966- October 1969; Parents' Magazine and Better Family Living, November 1969- June 1977; Parents' Magazine, July 1977-December 1978; Parents, January 1979-current.


VOLUME AND ISSUE DATA

October 1926-current, monthly.


PUBLISHER AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION

George J. Hecht, October 1926-July 1978; John G. Hahn, August 1978-current. New York.


EDITORS

Board of Editors ( George J. Hecht, president; Clara Savage Littledale, managing editor), October 1926-January 1931; Clara Savage Littledale, February 1931- March 1956; Mary E. Buchanan, April 1956-February 1965; Dorothy Whyte Cotton, March 1965-December 1970; Genevieve Millet Landau, January 1971- July 1978; Peter A. Janssen, August 1978-December 1978; Elizabeth Crow, January 1979-August 1988; Ann Pleshette Murphy, September 1988-current.


CIRCULATION

1,756,853 ( 1988).

Barbara Nourie

PENNSYLVANIA GRIT. See GRIT


PEOPLE WEEKLY

One of the most successful personality-oriented magazines on the market is People Weekly, published since 1974 by Time. Commonly referred to as People, People Weekly is reminiscent of the fan magazines of the 1930s and 1940s. It has the look of Photoplay or Life,* yet maintains the kind of intimacy that daily newspapers enjoy with their readers. It appeared at a time when the nation was tired of heavy news items and issue-oriented journalism. Filling a void in the

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