American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

Publication History

MAGAZINE TITLE AND TITLE CHANGES

Sunset, 1898-1912; Sunset: The Pacific Monthly, 1912-1943 (some variation between titles Sunset and Sunset Magazine); Sunset: The Magazine of Western Living, 1943-present.


VOLUME AND ISSUE DATA

Vols. 1-181, May 1898-present, monthly.


PUBLISHER AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION

Southern Pacific Company, 1898-1914, San Francisco, California; Woodhead, Field and Company, 1914-1928, San Francisco; L. W. Lane, Sr., Lane Publishing Company, 1929-1959, San Francisco and Menlo Park, California; L. W. Lane, Jr., Lane Publishing Company, 1959-1986, Menlo Park, California; Melvin B. Lane, Lane Publishing Company, 1986-present, Menlo Park, California.


EDITORS

E. H. Woodman and other Southern Pacific Passenger Division Staff, 1898-1902; Charles Sedgewick Aiken, 1902-1911; Charles K. Field, 1911-1925; Charles H. Woolley, 1925-1928; Lou Richardson and Genevieve Callahan, 1928-1937; William Nichols, 1937-1939; Walter L. Doty, 1939-1954; Proctor Mellquist, 1954- 1982; William Marken, 1982-present.


CIRCULATION

Approximately 1.3-1.5 million.

Dorothy Jones


THE SURVEY

For more than half a century, The Survey was the nation's unrivaled journal in promoting public welfare and social reform. Directing itself toward social inquiry, it sought to accelerate change by getting "at the facts of social conditions in ways that would count." 1 The foremost outlet for the examination of critical social issues, it succeeded in influencing social thought and furthering movement toward the realization of humanistic goals in all areas of social and economic welfare.

The founding of The Survey was in direct response to the need for a journal that could address the concerns of professionals in the emerging field of social work. Dr. Edward Thomas Devine launched the publication in 1897 as the second official organ of the Charity Organization Society (COS) of the City of New York. The publication, then titled Charities: A Monthly Review of Local and General Philanthropy, was designed to provide news and information to persons engaged in philanthropic and charitable work. At the end of the first year, it became a weekly, and in March 1901, it absorbed the older organ of the New York Society, Charities Review. Subsequent mergers with the Commons ( 1905), the national organ of the settlement movement, and Jewish Charity ( 1906), the official paper of the United Hebrew Charities of New York, resulted in uniting conflicting ideologies and broadening the magazine's scope.

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