American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

EDITORS

Editor-in-chief, position created in 1950: Henry R. Luce 1950-1964; Hedley Donovan, 1964-1979; Henry A. Grunwald, 1979-1987, Jason McManus, 1987- present. Editor, position began 1923, ended 1950: Briton Hadden and Henry R. Luce, 1923-1929 (alternating years); Henry R. Luce, 1929-1943; Henry R. Luce and Manfred Gottfried, 1943-1949; Thomas S. Matthews, 1949-1952. Managing editor, position began 1929: John S. Martin, 1929-1933; John S. Billings, 1934- 1937; Manfred Gottfried, 1937-1943; T. S. Matthews, 1943-1949; Roy Alexander, 1949-1960; Otto Fuerbringer, 1960-1968; Henry Grunwald, 1968-1977; Ray Cave, 1977-1985; Jason McManus, 1986-1987; Henry Muller, 1987-present.


CIRCULATION

4.6 million.

Jean M. Parker

TODAY'S HEALTH. See HEALTH


TOWN AND COUNTRY

Town and Country began its long history as the Home Journal, an illustrated weekly founded in 1846. As the second oldest general magazine in the United States, Town and Country's longevity can be attributed to its adaptation through the years to the specific goals and audience for which it was created.

Nathaniel Parker Willis and George P. Morris, founders of the new publication, believed that "the workaday Republic was beginning to yield leisure for uneconomic pursuits."1 They saw a need for a periodical "which picks, arranges, condenses, and gives in small compass, 'the cream and substance' of the week's wilderness of newspaper reading, while, at the same time, the greater portion of its space is devoted to matter which is instructive, companionable and amusing."2 The Home Journal was created to promote a marriage between intellect and fashion according to the European standard. Its purpose was to focus on "Society" and "Literature" and to avoid, especially in that period before the Civil War, any political issues or causes. The magazine was intended to reach an audience characterized by Willis as "the upper ten thousand." These were the leaders of society and those who followed the manners and tastes dictated by them.

Willis and Morris were members of that distinctive New York society they wished to instruct, amuse, and refine. Both men had been involved in the newspaper business separately and together before their venture into the Home Journal. General George Morris had been editor of the New York Mirror, and N. P. Willis was famous not only as an author but also as a commentator about himself and the elegant world in which he traveled. He developed a style of gossip that Lucius Beebe was to make famous in more recent history. However, as the

-501-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Mass-Market Magazines
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 616

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.