American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

known through the news of the war. When the end of the war finally did come, American society had changed. "Men and women of the armed forces had become accustomed to traveling, if involuntarily, during the war; presumably, they would retain the habit under pleasanter circumstances."4 And not only would Americans have the habit of travel, but they would also have the time and money.

In the 1950s and 1960s under the editorship of Malcolm McTear Davis , the direction of the magazine was set for the active traveler. "Now, Travel steps forward again with this first issue of 1952. It is newly thickened, newly styled, newly geared to the demands of the modern traveler."5 The dimensions of the magazine (8″ × 10″) became what they are today, and the publication's subtitle, The Magazine That Roams the Globe, was first introduced during this period. The contents of the periodical included short foreign-language phrases with their phonetic pronunciation and English translation. There were features on tours of the month, a special calendar of worldwide events for the month, a New York Broadway theater guide, and reviews of new hotels. Regular how-to articles appeared, such as "How to Stretch Your Motoring Dollar" and even "How to Obtain an Audience with the Pope."

Two successful mergers took place during the 1970s. In 1977, Travel merged with the monthly Holiday. The latter was a general travel periodical published by the Saturday Evening Post Company and had a reported circulation of 450,000. In 1979 the new Travel-Holiday incorporated Travel Adviser, a periodical that had been founded in 1976 and reported a circulation of 55,000. By the beginning of the 1980s Travel-Holiday could boast of a circulation in excess of 750,000.

Travel-Holiday is as responsive to its audience today as it was eighty years ago. The price remains reasonable, the text both helpful and informative, the color photography artistic and exciting. An editorial policy committed and sensitive to the best interests of its readership guarantees Travel-Holiday a longevity and seniority in the travel publishing business for years to come.


Notes
1.
Gleason's Pictorial of 1853, quoted in Frank Luther Mott, A History of American Magazines. Vol. 2: 1850-1865 ( Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1938), pp. 176- 78.
3.
"Background for War," Travel-Holiday, July 1942, p. 27.
4.
Theodore Peterson, Magazines in the Twentieth Century ( Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1956), p. 351.
5.
"Editor's Log", Travel-Holiday, January 1952, p. 3.

Information Sources

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Mott, Frank Luther. A History of American Magazines. Vol. 2: 1850-1865. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1938.

-509-

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