American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

The 1985 redesign divided the publication into six new sections. With all the attempt at modernization and image improvement, the publication still closes its pages on Fridays--giving rivals Time and Newsweek a clear advantage. At least one of Zuckerman's position shufflings did not work totally either. Harold Evans, former editorial director of U.S. News and World Report, moved on after working as Editor-in-Chief of Atlantic Monthly Press ( 1984-1986) to become an adviser to S. I. Newhouse at Conde Nast, working on new magazine ideas. 59 However, as a result of price-cutting on subscriptions, and by appealing to a wider audience, the circulation increased to 2,255,943. 60

A change recently reported concerns the expansion of News You Can Use into an entire section. With the 3 August 1987 issue the section covers personal finance, taxes, careers, and travel, as well as health, nutrition, fitness, and education. President and chief executive office Fred Drasner also provided a thumbnail sketch of the U.S. News and World Report reader: one twice as likely as the general population to have graduated from college, twice as likely to hold a professional or managerial job, and with an income 35 percent higher than the average adult American's. A 1987 Simmons Market Research Bureau study was used by Dresner as the source for the above data. Finally, U.S. News and World Report teamed up with British journalist David Frost to interview the major candidates in the 1988 U.S. presidential election. Excerpts appeared in the periodical, with the interviews broadcast nationally in a weekly series of one- hour specials, and a daily series of shorter radio segments. 61


Notes
1.
Arthur Krock, "Unforgettable David Lawrence," Reader's Digest, January 1974, pp. 75-76. Krock won three Pulitzer Prizes in thirty-five years as Washington correspondent and columnist for the New York Times. He retired in 1967.
2.
Edgar Kemler, "The Lawrence Riddle. The Man or the Times?" Nation, 19 March 1955, p. 235.
3.
Ibid.
4.
Ibid.
6.
Ibid.
7.
"Competition--From Inside and Out--Grips Magazines," Business Week, 12 July 1952, p. 38.
8.
John H. Sweet, "How Did You Do It?" U.S. News and World Report, 8 August 1952, p. 4.
9.
Ben H. Bagdikian, "The Newsmagazines. I--U.S. News and World Report," New Republic, 2 February 1959, p. 12. Bagdikian was a reporter for the Providence Journal-Bulletin, where the article appeared originally.
11.
"A Statement by U.S. News and World Report, Inc.," U. S. News and World Report, 9 July 1962, p. 4.
12.
David Lawrence, "Our 30th Anniversary," U.S. News and World Report, 27 May 1963, p. 108. As with each of the editorials, the following appears at the top of the

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