American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview
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Mahon, Gigi. "Hartz Content: The Good Life of Leonard Stern." New York, 5 May 1986, pp. 42-48.

Martin, Ann Ray. "The Voice of Felker." Newsweek, 23 June 1975, pp. 46, 51.

Rupp, Carla Marie. "Village Voice Blows Out Its 20th Candle." Editor and Publisher, 1 November 1975, pp. 18-19.

Sale, J. Kirk. "The Village Voice: You've Come a Long Way, Baby, But You Got Stuck There." Evergreen Review, December 1969, pp. 25-27, 61-67.


INDEX SOURCES

New Periodicals Index (ceased); Access, ( 1975-present); Book Review Index; Film Literature Index; Music Index ( 1976-present); Media Review Digest; Alternative Press Index ( 1969-1970).


LOCATION SOURCES

Library of Congress, many other libraries. Available in microform.


Publication History

MAGAZINE TITLE AND TITLE CHANGES

Village Voice.


VOLUME AND ISSUE DATA

Vol. 1-present, 26 October 1955-present, weekly.


PUBLISHER AND PLACE OF PUBLICATION

Edwin Fancher, 1955-1974; Bartle Bull, 1974-1975; Clay Felker, 1976-1977; William Ryan, 1977-1981; Martin Singerman and John Evans, 1982-1986; David Schneiderman, 1987-1988; Sally J. Cohen, 1989-present. New York, New York.


EDITORS

Daniel Wolf, 1955-1974; Ross Wetzsteon, 1974; Thomas Morgan, 1975-1976; Marianne Partridge, 1976-1979; David Schneiderman, 1979-1987; Robert Freidman, 1987-1988; Martin Gottlieb, 1988; Jonathan Z. Larsen, 1989-present.


CIRCULATION

147,529.

Carole Palmer


VOGUE

Vogue had a history before Edna Chase edited it and before Conde Nast published it, but its prestige and success were chiefly determined by this skilled pair in the early twentieth century. Chase began in the Vogue circulation department in 1895, advanced to editor in 1914, and finally climbed to editor-in- chief when Vogue expanded to international editions in the late 1920s. During her thirty-seven years at the helm, Chase directed a publication that originated as a weekly pictorial record of society under first publisher, Arthur B. Turnure. Although Vogue continued to feature the haut monde, by the turn of the century greater emphasis was being placed on fashion as a device to attract advertisers. The ploy worked and fashion continued to be Vogue's main focus after the publication was bought by Conde Nast in 1909.

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