American Mass-Market Magazines

By Alan Nourie; Barbara Nourie | Go to book overview

here was a somewhat greater attempt to deal with real content on a variety of topics.

A disappointing change in the Mirabella years was in the visual style of the publication. Once known for its elegance and artistic appearance, the periodical now began to look like Glamour, its sister publication for a college audience. The tendency to cram many small images into each page made the fashion sections far less memorable than the advertisements.

The Wintour years at Vogue began in December 1988, when H. G.'s wunderkind Anna Wintour was appointed editor. Within her first year, Wintour's presence was apparent in a more spacious and visually attractive format, as well as in the higher level of the contributors. Deborah Turbeville's murky fashion photographs of the earlier 1980s were replaced by bright and sassy footage by Patrick Demarchelier and others.

Just as the range of topics covered in the 1980s Vogue was expanded, so did the bulk of the magazine itself, from an average 170 pages in the early 1960s to a monster of 300-400 pages monthly. Though the proportion of advertising to text went up only 10 percent since the mid-1960s, the sheer number of advertising pages continued to increase. Edna Chase and Conde Nast would be proud parents of the present Vogue.


Notes
1.
"The Press: Condé Nast." (obituary) Time, 28 September 1942, pp. 51-52.
2.
Edna Woolman Chase, Always in Vogue (Garden City: Doubleday and Company, 1954), p. 160.

Information Sources

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Ballard, Bettina. In My Fashion. New York: David McKay Co., 1960.

Chase, Edna Woolman. Always in Vogue. Garden City: Doubleday, and Co., 1954.

-----. "Fifty Years with Vogue." Vogue, 15 November 1943, p. 35.

Compaigne, Benjamin. The Business of Consumer Magazines. White Plains, N.Y.: Knowledge Publications, 1982.

Katz, Bill, and Linda Sternberg Katz. Magazines for Libraries. 5th ed. New York and London: R. R. Bowker Company, 1986.

Kissel, H. "Diana Vreeland-Empress of Fashion." Horizon, March 1980, pp. 26-27.

Mott, Frank Luther. A History of American Magazines. Vol. 4: 1885-1905. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1957.

Peterson, Theodore. Magazines in the Twentieth Century. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1964.

Robinson, Walter G. "With the Makers of Vogue." Vogue, 1 January 1923, p. 74.

Ross, Josephine. Beaton in Vogue. London: Thames and Hudson, 1986.

Seebohm, Caroline. The Man Who Was Vogue. New York: Viking Press, 1982.

Vreeland, Diana. D. V. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1984.

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