State Building and Conflict Resolution in Colombia, 1986-1994

By Harvey F. Kline | Go to book overview

Bernardo Jaramillo, presidential candidate of the UP, was assassinated, opened a Pandora's box.45 The cause here was the government's statement that the Extraditables had been the "intellectual authors" of the Jaramillo assassination.


Conclusion

As described in this chapter, the government of Virgilio Barco vacillated between a military policy and a policy of talks with representatives of the drug dealers. The final result was failure, as Pablo Escobar and other Medellín drug leaders were still at liberty, and violence continued at a level that was very high, even by Colombian standards.

One might ask, especially given the number of deaths that resulted from the military policy, why the government of Virgilio Barco did not make more attempts at conflict resolution through bargaining. One reason was that there was much opposition, both in the government and in educated Colombian society, for this kind of treatment for the narcos. The journal Semana captured the basis of the antagonism to bargaining with the narcos when it pointed out the difference between them and the guerrillas in juridical, ethical, and political dimensions:

To begin with, the amnesty decreed in 1982 for guerrilla groups covered political crimes, but did not include aggravated homicide, terrorism, and murder outside of combat, which are precisely the crimes for which the Medellín cartel is wanted. On the other hand, the guerrillas are recognized as having a political status since, independent of their methods of struggle, the reasons that lead them to take arms are ideological. Those who have studied the question affirmed that the motivation of the narcos was the desire to make money and that any possible political motivation they might have came from the defense of that interest. However, this interpretation might be arbitrary if one keeps in mind that today there are many guerrillas dedicated more to making money than to political ideals. . . . But, in addition to this, perhaps the principal reason that the state does not consider any negotiation with the narcos possible is out of respect for the martyrs who have fallen in this struggle.46

The last reason--respect for the martyrs--should be emphasized, as guerrilla violence almost always was in the countryside, with the deaths and injuries being to the peasants and the soldiers. When others were affected by guerrilla violence, as will be seen in chapter 6, the whole nature of negotiations changed. The narcos not only placed their bombs in the major cities, hence killing people of various social

-57-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
State Building and Conflict Resolution in Colombia, 1986-1994
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 244

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.