William Penn and the Founding of Pennsylvania: A Documentary History

By Jean R. Soderlund | Go to book overview

sore fit of illness, that they call St. Anthony's fire,3 in my face and a fever. I could not see [but] very little several days and nights, my face and eyes were so swelled but it pleased the Lord to raise me up again. I am not wholly come to my strength yet; my eyes are very weak. Thy son and daughter Rous have been here since to see me. Bethia has been here a pretty [long] while.4 I think she will write.

I have had several letters from my husband. He was then very well and Friends [also]. They have large meetings at Philadelphia which is the city, 300 at a meeting. I lately received this epistle from him and Friends,5 which I was desirous thou should see it. I know not whether thou has had it from any other. I expect to hear shortly what my husband will have me to do, whether I shall go this year or no, but fear if he does send I shall scarce be well enough yet to go. I am truly glad when I hear of you or from you. Here was Thomas Langhorne that gave me an account of your welfare. Our meetings here are quiet at present. I desire my very dear love to Thomas Lower and Mary, and to Daniel Abraham and Rachel, and to Isabell,6 which is again to thyself beyond expression.

Thy truly affectionate friend that truly loves and honors thee in the Lord, Gulielma Maria Penn

ALS. Chester County Historical Society. ( PWP, 2:460-61).
1. Gulielma gave birth to her seventh child, a daughter, in early Mar. 1683. The infant was apparently "in good health" when James Claypoole visited Warminghurst on 20-26 Mar. (see doc. 58, above) but died soon after. Her name and exact birth and death dates are not known.
2. George Fox had visited Gulielma with the Claypooles; see doc. 58, above.
3. A disease that causes fever and intense local inflammation, particularly on the face or legs.
4. Margaret Fox's eldest child, Margaret, was married to John Rous, a Barbados Friend who had moved to London. Bethia Rous (b. 1666) was their daughter.
5. Only one letter written by WP to Gulielma from Pennsylvania now survives (doc. 100, below). The letter that Gulielma passed on to Margaret Fox was probably a circular letter from a Friends' meeting in Pennsylvania to Friends in England.
6. Mary, Rachel, and Isabell were Margaret's daughters. Mary was married to Thomas Lower and Rachel to Daniel Abraham; Isabell Fell Yeamans was a widow, and was probably living with her mother at Swarthmore Hall, Lancs.

78
From William Haige

I N August 1683 WP sent commissioners James Graham and William Haige to Albany, New York, to purchase land along the Susquehanna River from the Indians (see doc. 72, above). On 27 August, Haige arrived in New

-325-

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