Cubism and Twentieth-Century Art

By Robert Rosenblum | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

In preparing this study, I have accumulated many debts of gratitude to people, to institutions, and to books. Most of the time and support required for a period of uninterrupted writing was generously provided by Princeton University through a Procter and Gamble Fellowship in the fall semester, 1958. My research was constantly facilitated by Bernard Karpel and the members of his staff, who made the unsurpassed resources of the Museum of Modern Art Library a pleasure to use; and it was no less constantly inspired by Alfred H. Barr Cubism and Abstract Art ( 1936) and Picasso: Fifty Years of His Art ( 1946), two books that still offer the firmest general foundations for the student of Cubism. Many technical problems could not have been solved had it not been for the help of Ralph Colin, Daniel Henry Kahnweiler, Sidney Janis, Maurice Jardot, and Hermann Rupf; and it need hardly be said that this book would not exist at all were it not for the kindness of the many collectors who permitted their paintings and sculptures to be reproduced in these pages and who so often opened the doors of their homes to me. Of these collectors, I owe a particularly heavy debt to Douglas Cooper, who not only allowed me to see his unrivaled group of Cubist masterpieces, but who, in his capacity as a scholar of Cubism, was good enough to read my manuscript and to sharpen its accuracy of fact and interpretation. It is difficult to acknowledge specifically the many friends whose casual conversations engendered ideas that found their way into my text. It would be less than honest, however, not to mention how much of my thinking about Cubism, in particular, and modern art, in general, has been molded by the brilliant lectures and seminars of Professor George Heard Hamilton which I was privileged to attend at Yale University between 1948 and 1950. I must also offer my warmest thanks for the unfailingly intelligent and efficient practical support of Ursula Krauss, who, for a period of over two years, was involved in countless transatlantic complexities that ranged from photograph hunting to polyglot correspondence. Lastly, I wish to thank my editor, Irene Gordon, whose tireless interest and high standards improved this book in a multitude of large and small ways.

Robert Rosenblum Princeton, 1959

-vi-

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