The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814

By H. St. L. B. Moss | Go to book overview

CONTENTS

Part I. ROMANS AND BARBARIANS
I. THE ROMAN WORLD1
1. Peace and unity of civilized Europe --inter-provincial trade--commerce with Asia--causes of uniformity in the Roman world--contrast between East and West--dangers to the Empire--economic crisis--reforms of Diocletian-- Christianity and paganism
2. East and West fall apart after death of Theodosius --but Empire still one and indivisible--importance of this conception--Constantinople the real centre--decline of Rome14
3. Frontiers in 395 --Britain and the Saxon invasions--the Rhine frontier-Gaul--the Danube region--Armenia and the Euphrates line--Africa16
4. The army --changes during fourth century--organization, arms, tactics--superiority to barbarian troops disappears-- growth of personal retainers--barbarian character of army 19
5. Constitutional position of Emperor --dynastic principle-- checks on absolutism--administrative centralization-- corruption of governing machine--the Senate--ordo senatorius--stabilization of currency and prices--taxation 21
6. Lower classes --coloni--land-system--peasant risings--trade and industry--collegia26
7. Middle classes --city life--curiales--extinction of curiai class 28
8. Upper classes --life in country houses--growth of 'house- economy'--differing local conditions--luxury and display 29
9. Outlook of the age --archaism in literature--rhetoric-- Christian poetry--transitional character of period 31
10. The Church --political and racial basis of ecclesiastical rivalries--unity as aim of Imperial policy--doctrinal issues --Arianism, Sabellianism in fourth century--contest of Alexandria and Constantinople in fifth century--rise of monasticism--secular power of Church 33
II. THE BARBARIAN WORLD38
1. Sketch of invasions --local and intermittent barbarian pressure on Roman frontiers--crisis of mid-fourth century --break-up of Western provinces 38
2. Early Germany --Baltic settlements--West Germans--East Germans--Teutonic outlook and institutions--gau, hundred--folkmoot, chiefs--army, methods of fighting--social classes--numbers of the invaders 39

-ix-

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The Birth of the Middle Ages, 395-814
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents ix
  • Description of Illustrations xvi
  • Part I- Romans and Barbarians 1
  • I- The Roman World 1
  • II- The Barbarian World 38
  • III- The Clash of Cultures 57
  • Part II- The Triumph of Justinian 79
  • IV- Constantinople *
  • V- Justinian and the West 95
  • VI- Justinian and the East 108
  • VII- The Aftermath 125
  • Part III- The Onslaught of Islam 143
  • VIII- The Faith 143
  • IX- The Conquest 149
  • X- The Culture 159
  • Part IV- The Age of Charlemagne 175
  • XI- The European Background 175
  • XII- The Franks 193
  • XIII- The Papacy 222
  • Appendix A 266
  • Appendix B 270
  • Chronological Table 275
  • Bibliography 283
  • Index 288
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