Chapter 5
FREEDOM OF MOVEMENT

a) Movement of Africans Within the Territories

Social and economic life in the Federation is so ordered that a handful of Europeans, many of whom have lived most or all of their lives in a country populated almost entirely by blacks, are able to construct for themselves an environment only as incidentally African as a Pullman car.

Where the European population works, lives and vacations, the African is, in all but the most unavoidable instances, kept carefully out of sight: in the native reserves, the native townships or the servant quarters which squat like outhouses behind the European homes.

Towns like Salisbury or Bulawayo, agricultural areas like Marandellas, resort spas like the Inyanga Highlands are as un-African as Bois, Idaho, or the Surrey countryside which they resemble.

This illusion of a white Africa can only be created at substantial cost: economic, social and political. Because normal contact between various- hued people of the Federation must be sacrificed to the illusion, the tiny European enclaves live in fearful ignorance of the African masses, the "awakening giant," the enveloping unknown.

This cannot but afflict the European population. In the opinion of Southern Rhodesia's former Prime Minister Garfield Todd, the enclave mentality produces a race of white neurotics. Certainly, it does appear to create a determined, almost frantic social orientation which is typical of the enclave and is designed for escaping an unknown, imminent menace in a whirl of "good living" and "living only for the present." It also produces a cohesive group-loyalty which is harsh in its judgment on dissenters and non-conformists, thereby stultifying the process of change and creativity.

-87-

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