Chapter 6
SOME NORMATIVE RIGHTS OF BRITISH JUSTICE
There are certain legal precepts which are so fundamental to the British system of jurisprudence that they have not been written down: to reduce them to paper and ink would be to slight the ages which alone could author a usage so firmly established in the courts of law.Four of these precepts are relevant to this study, for they are under attack in British Central Africa:
Precept One: The law shall treat all offenders equally without regard to their person.
Precept Two: No man shall be a judge in his own cause.
Precept Three: No free man shall be compelled by law to perform private services against his will.
Precept Four: No man shall be punished without the right to trial.

These four precepts are cornerstones in the relation, through law, of the individual to his community. How are they challenged in the Federation?


Precept One: The law shall treat all offenders equally without regard to their persons.

How color-blind are the courts of central Africa?

The judicial system of the Federation, except for the Federal Supreme Court, remains, under the Constitution, a territorial matter and there is wide variation of policy between Southern Rhodesia and the two Protectorates. Because, for reasons discussed in a later chapter, the Protectorates are dedicated to the maintenance of tribal authority and the principle of "indirect rule" fathered by Lord Lugard,1 they have estab-

-99-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Nationalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 374

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.