The Soviet Union and International Law: A Study Based on the Legislation, Treaties and Foreign Relations of the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics

By T. A. Taracouzio; Soviet Union Bureau of International Research of Harvard University and Radcliffe College | Go to book overview
Save to active project

PREFACE

AN evaluation of any legal system in the course of active development is a hazardous undertaking. This is particularly true as regards the impingement of Communism upon international law. Previous experiments in Communism, although not without international repercussions, have been either on too small a scale, or of too short duration, seriously to affect the settled course of international relations. In Russia, however, Communism has been embraced by a nation of more than a hundred and sixty millions, and the state thus established has endured for over fifteen years. Although these factors assure an international rôle for the Soviets, sufficient time has not yet elapsed for the historian to write with the proper perspective. Moreover, the attitude of the Soviets has not yet crystallized, but is still undergoing fundamental changes, which are reflected in the altered position which they hold in the eyes of the rest of the world. For these reasons the present study makes no pretense at approbation or censure of the Soviet attitude towards international law. Its object is rather to discover as far as possible the bases underlying the Soviet interpretation of the principles involved, and to disclose the degree and the fashion of their actual application in the international life of the U.S.S.R. For this double purpose an examination of the purely political aspects of the international conduct of the Soviets does not suffice, since the foreign as well as the domestic policy of a nation is all too frequently merely an irrational, even opportunistic, attempt at adjustment to transitory but compelling conditions.

The materials on which the present study is based may be divided broadly into the following four groups: (1) The works of Karl Marx, Frederick Engels, and Nicolas Lenin, (2) Soviet national laws, regulations and departmental instructions, (3) International treaties entered into by the Soviets, and (4) Works of Soviet authorities on international law. Whereas the theoretic

-vii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Soviet Union and International Law: A Study Based on the Legislation, Treaties and Foreign Relations of the Union of Socialist Soviet Republics
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen
/ 534

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?