Selected Papers of Homer Cummings, Attorney General of the United States, 1933-1939

By Carl Brent Swisher; Homer S. Cummings | Go to book overview

4. State and Federal Jurisdiction

[The enactment of new federal legislation for crime suppression immediately raised questions of constitutionality, based on federal encroachment upon the traditional activities of the states. The Supreme Court had previously upheld such federal statutes dealing with interstate crime as the Mann Act and the Motor Vehicle Theft Act, but the Attorney General of the preceding administration had been reluctant to assent to extension of federal activity in the criminal field. Faced with the growing seriousness of the crime problem, however, Attorney General Cummings deemed it necessary to extend federal control over the no man's land, the "unholy sanctuary" of crime, which lay between state and federal jurisdictions. Statutes were prepared with care. Developments were carefully studied. Moreover, the new crime program contemplated a minimum of federal interference with local enforcement and a maximum of assistance to, and cooperation with, state and local authorities. Generally, among lawyers, the validity of these measures has been assumed. Ed.]


From an address at "The Attorney General's Crime Conference," December 10, 1934:

THERE was a time when, with a slow moving civilization, it was possible to treat crime largely as a local problem. The sphere of federal criminal law enforcement related almost exclusively to highly specialized phases of governmental action, as, for instance, where the work of the Post Office Department or the Bureau of Internal Revenue was interfered with by criminal acts. Today the intricate web of improved highways, of railway lines, of telephone and telegraph service, to say nothing of the automobile, airplane, and the radio, have, for many practical purposes, erased the divisional lines between states and between their various local subdivisions. Where the stealing of a horse a generation ago was a matter to be handled by the local sheriff and the local courts, the theft of an automobile today is not only a matter of local law enforcement, but, in the event of interstate transportation, it becomes a federal problem as well. Examples could be multiplied indefinitely of the many and varied

-43-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Selected Papers of Homer Cummings, Attorney General of the United States, 1933-1939
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 320

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.