Sources and Documents Illustrating the American Revolution, 1764-1788, and the Formation of the Federal Constitution

By S. E. Morison | Go to book overview

SOURCES AND DOCUMENTS
FROM THE ROYAL PROCLAMATION ON NORTH AMERICA,1 7 OCTOBER 1763

BY THE KING. A PROCLAMATION. GEORGE R.

WHEREAS we have taken into our royal consideration the extensive and valuable acquisitions in America secured to our Crown by the late definitive treaty of peace concluded at Paris the 10th day of February last; and being desirous that all our loving subjects, as well of our kingdoms as of our colonies in America, may avail themselves, with all convenient speed, of the great benefits and advantages which must accrue therefrom to their commerce, manufactures, and navigation; we have thought fit, with the advice of our Privy Council, to issue this our Royal Proclamation, hereby to publish and declare to all our loving subjects that we have, with the advice of our said Privy Council, granted our letters patent under our Great Seal of Great Britain, to erect within the countries and islands ceded and confirmed to us by the said treaty, four distinct and separate governments, styled and called by the names of Quebec, East Florida, West Florida, and Grenada, and limited and bounded as follows, viz.:

First, the Government of Quebec, bounded on the Labrador coast by the river St. John, and from thence by a line drawn from the head of that river, through the lake St. John, to the south end of the lake Nipissim; from whence the said line, crossing the river St. Lawrence and the lake Champlain in 45 degrees of north latitude, passes along the high lands which divide the rivers that empty themselves into the said river St. Lawrence from those which fall into the sea; . . .

Secondly, the Government of East Florida, bounded to the westward by the gulf of Mexico and the Apalachicola river; to the northward, by a line drawn from that part of the said river where the Chatahoochee and Flint rivers meet, to the

____________________
1
Annual Register for 1763, pp. 208-13. Also printed in full, from the manuscript, in Shortt and Doughty, Documents relating to Constitutional History of Canada, pp. 119-23.

-1-

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