Time, Science, and Society in China and the West

By J. T. Fraser; N. Lawrence et al. | Go to book overview

Biographical Notes on the Contributors
Hans Ågren was born in 1945 and received his B.A. in Oriental languages from Uppsala University, where he later also earned his M.D. and Ph.D. He is now on the Faculty of Medicine at Uppsala as a clinical assistant professor of psychiatry, doing research in the psychobiology of affective illness. He studied Chinese and Japanese medical history in Kyoto on a Japanese scholarship ( 1971-73) and later did research using primary sources available in Sweden and England on thought patterns and the history of ideas in traditional medical systems in East Asia.
Anindita Niyogi Balslev has an M.A. in philosophy from Calcutta University and a Ph.D. in philosophy (existentialism and Buddhism) from the University of Paris ( 1968). She has done teaching and research in India, France, the United States, and Denmark.
Denis Corish is Chairman of the Department of Philosophy, Bowdoin College, Brunswick, Maine. One of his main interests is the history of theories of time. He has published articles on time in Isis, Phronesis, the Review of Metaphysics, and in previous volumes of The Study of Time.
Fan Dainian graduated in 1948 from the Physics Department of Zhejiang University, China. He is currently the vice editor-in-chief of the Journal of Dialectics of Nature and professor at the Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. His current research focuses on the history and philosophy of physics and history of science in the United States.
Fan Hongye, an editor of the Journal of Dialectics of Nature, graduated in 1965 from the Chemisty Department of Jilin University, China. He has published fourteen papers and a book in the fields of history and sociology of science.
George H. Ford holds a Ph.D. from Yale and is Professor of English at the University of Rochester and a former Chairman of the department. He has published books on the poetry of John Keats and on the novels of Charles Dickens and D. H. Lawrence, and has also written articles on the role of time in works of literature. Important literary texts that he has edited include the Victorian sections of The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ford has been awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship, an ACLS Fellowship, and a Huntington Library Fellowship, and he holds membership in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. In 1983 he was awarded the Wilbur Cross medal by Yale University, a year in which he completed his four-year term as President of the International Society for the Study of Time.

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