Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research

By Glen Haydon | Go to book overview

limited resources to do creditable work in the graduate field.

In the early stages of graduate training, research exercises of modest scope will give the student experience in discovering, evaluating, and defining the problem; in applying typical research procedures used in experimental research, survey, historical research, prognostic research, and philosophical analysis; in making a bibliography; in collecting, analyzing, and classifying data; and in the final report of investigations. The subjects chosen for investigation should be serious, properly oriented to the general field of musicology, and provocative of thought. Mere accumulation of data is of little value unless motivated by a significant idea. The master's thesis need not be a contribution to knowledge, though it should be a genuine test of the student's ability to do creative research while maintaining an objective attitude. The doctor's dissertation, however, must be a real contribution to knowledge.

In assisting the graduate student in his program of research, the adviser in charge of the work should carefully weigh the student's special interests and educational background. He should guide the student in his work so as to avoid unnecessary waste of time and energy. To this end he should see that the problem is a significant one, carefully defined and delimited, susceptible to scientific treatment, and within the student's capacity. Though he should be ready to give counsel as needed at all stages of the work, the adviser should take care not to deprive the student of the main responsibility for the work. By precept and example he may stimulate the student and guide him to a successful completion of his task.


BIBLIOGRAPHY

The following bibliography contains chiefly general literature on education and musical pedagogy; for the extensive literature on special subjects see the bibliographies contained in the works cited and in the lists of books on music of the National Associa

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Musicology: A Survey of the Fields, Systematic & Historical, of Musical Knowledge & Research
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 338

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.