Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 2

By John W. Rettig; Saint Augustine Bishop of Hippo | Go to book overview

TRACTATE 18

On John 5.19-20

JOHN THE EVANGELIST, among his colleagues and partners, the other evangelists, has received from the Lord (upon whose breast he reclined at the supper1 that he might signify thereby that he drank the deeper secrets from depths of his heart) this special and particular gift, that he should say about the Son of God those things which can stir, perhaps, the attentive minds of the little ones, but cannot fill them, not yet able to understand. But to all minds somewhat more matured and attaining a certain age of inner manhood, he gives in his words something by which they may be exercised and fed. You heard it when it was read and you recall how this discourse came about. For yesterday it was read, "This is why the Jews wanted to kill Jesus, because he not only broke the Sabbath, but also said God was his Father, making himself equal to God."2 This which displeased the Jews pleased the Father himself. Without a doubt this also pleases those who do honor to the Son as they do to the Father, because if it should not please them, they will be displeasing.3 For God will not be greater because he pleases you; but you will be lesser if he displeases you.4 But against this calumny of theirs, coming either from ignorance or from malice, the Lord does not at all say something which they may grasp but [something] by which they may be disturbed and troubled and perhaps, when troubled, may even seek the physician. Moreover, he said things which were to be written

____________________
1
Cf. Jn 13.23-25. For a similar interpretation of this event cf. Tractates 1.7, 16.2, 20.1, 36.1, 61.5-6, 119.2, and 124.7.
2
Cf. Jn 5.18.
3
Cf. Jn 5.23.
4
Cf. Tractate 11.5.

-124-

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Tractates on the Gospel of John - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Abbreviations vii
  • Bibliography ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Tractate 11 9
  • Tractate 12 28
  • Tractate 13 44
  • Tractate 14 63
  • Tractate 15 78
  • Tractate 16 100
  • Tractate 17 108
  • Tractate 18 124
  • Tractate 19 139
  • Tractate 20 163
  • Tractate 21 178
  • Tractate 22 197
  • Tractate 23 212
  • Tractate 24 231
  • Tractate 25 239
  • Tractate 26 259
  • Tractate 27 277
  • Indices 289
  • Index of Holy Scripture 301
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