Homilies on Luke: Fragments on Luke

By Joseph T. Lienhard; Origen | Go to book overview

HOMILY 6 Luke 1.24-32

On the passage from, "But, when Elizabeth conceived, she kept herself hidden," up to the point where it says, "He will be great."

WHEN ELIZABETH CONCEIVED, "she kept herself hidden for five months. She said, 'The Lord did this for me when he showed concern for me and took away the reason people reproach me.'"1. I ask why she avoided public notice after she realized that she was pregnant.2. Unless I am mistaken, the reason is this. Even those who are joined in marriage do not consider every season free for intercourse. At times they abstain from the use of marriage. If the husband and wife are both aged, it is a disgraceful thing for them to yield to lust and turn to mating. The decline of the body, old age itself, and God's will all inhibit this act. But Elizabeth had relations with her husband once again, because of the angel's word and God's dispensation.3. She was embarrassed because she was an old and feeble woman, and had gone back to what young people do.

2. Hence "she kept herself hidden for five months"--not until the ninth month, when childbirth was impending, but until Mary also conceived. When Mary conceived and came to Elizabeth, and "her greeting resounded in [her] ears, the child in [ Elizabeth's] womb leapt for joy."4.Elizabeth prophesied. She was filled with the Holy Spirit. She spoke the words

____________________
1.
Lk 1.24-25.
2.
Cf. Ambrose, Exposition of the Gospel According to Luke 1.43.
3.
The Greek word οἰϰονομία, literally "the management of a household," was used by the Fathers to designate God's plan of salvation, and particularly the Incarnation. Jerome translated it with dispensatio.
4.
Lk 1.44.

-23-

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Homilies on Luke: Fragments on Luke
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Title Page vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Select Bibliography xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Homilies on Luke 1
  • Preface of Jerome the Presbyter 3
  • Homily 1 Luke 1.1-4 5
  • Homily 2 Luke 1.6 10
  • Homily 3 Luke 1.11 14
  • Homily 4 Luke 1.13-17 17
  • Homily 5 Luke 1.22 20
  • Homily 6 Luke 1.24-32 23
  • Homily 7 Luke 1.39-45 28
  • Homily 8 Luke 1.46-51 33
  • Homily 9 Luke 1.56-64 37
  • Homily 10 Luke 1.67-76 40
  • Homily 11 Luke 1.80-2.2 44
  • Homily 12 Luke 2.8-11 48
  • Homily 13 Luke 2.13-16 52
  • Homily 14 Luke 2.21-24 56
  • Homily 15 Luke 2.25-29 62
  • Homily 16 Luke 2.33-34 65
  • Homily 17 Luke 2.33-38 70
  • Homily 18 Luke 2.40-49 76
  • Homily 19 Luke 2.40.4-6 80
  • Homily 20 Luke 2.49-51 84
  • Homily 21 Luke 3.1-4 88
  • Homily 22 Luke 3.5-8 92
  • Homily 23 Luke 3.9-12 97
  • Homily 24 Luke 3.15-16 103
  • Homily 25 Luke 3.15 105
  • Homily 26 Luke 3. 16-17 109
  • Homily 27 Luke 3.18-22 112
  • Homily 28 Luke 3.23-38 115
  • Homily 29 Luke 4.1-4 119
  • Homily 30 Luke 4.5-8 123
  • Homily 31 Luke 4.9-12 125
  • Homily 32 Luke 4.14-20 130
  • Homily 33 Luke 4.23-27 134
  • Homily 34 Luke 10.25-37 137
  • Homily 35 Luke 12.57-59 142
  • Homily 36 Luke 17.20-21, 33 151
  • Homily 37 Luke 19.29-40 153
  • Homily 38 Luke 19.41-45 156
  • Homily 39 Luke 20.21-40 159
  • Fragments on Luke 163
  • Indices 229
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