Homilies on Luke: Fragments on Luke

By Joseph T. Lienhard; Origen | Go to book overview

HOMILY 15 Luke 2.25-29

Concerning Simeon, that he came to the temple in the Spirit, up to the
point where it says, "Now you dismiss your servant, Lord, in peace."

WE MUST SEEK an explanation worthy of God's purpose as to why, as is written in the Gospel, " Simeon, a holy man and one pleasing to God, awaiting the consolation of Israel, received an answer from the Holy Spirit that he would not perish in death before he saw the Lord's Anointed."1. What did he gain from seeing Christ? Did he have only this promised to him, that he would see him, and derive no profit from seeing him? Or is some gift worthy of God concealed here, a gift that the blessed Simeon both merited and received? "The woman touched the fringe of Jesus' garment and was healed." 2. If she derived such an advantage from the very edge of his garment, what should we think of Simeon, who "received" the infant "into his arms"?3. He held him in his arms, and kept rejoicing and exulting. He saw that the little child he was carrying had come to release captives and to free Simeon himself from the bonds of the body. Simeon knew that no one could release a man from the prison of the body with hope of life to come, except the one whom he enfolded in his arms.

2. Hence, he also says to him, "Now you dismiss your servant, Lord, in peace."4. For, as long as I did not hold Christ, as long as my arms did not enfold him, I was imprisoned, and unable to escape from my bonds." But this is true not only of Simeon, but of the whole human race. Anyone who departs from this

____________________
1.
Lk 2.25.
2.
Lk 8.44.
3.
Lk 2.28.
4.
Lk 2.29.

-62-

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Homilies on Luke: Fragments on Luke
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Title Page vii
  • Abbreviations ix
  • Select Bibliography xi
  • Introduction xv
  • Homilies on Luke 1
  • Preface of Jerome the Presbyter 3
  • Homily 1 Luke 1.1-4 5
  • Homily 2 Luke 1.6 10
  • Homily 3 Luke 1.11 14
  • Homily 4 Luke 1.13-17 17
  • Homily 5 Luke 1.22 20
  • Homily 6 Luke 1.24-32 23
  • Homily 7 Luke 1.39-45 28
  • Homily 8 Luke 1.46-51 33
  • Homily 9 Luke 1.56-64 37
  • Homily 10 Luke 1.67-76 40
  • Homily 11 Luke 1.80-2.2 44
  • Homily 12 Luke 2.8-11 48
  • Homily 13 Luke 2.13-16 52
  • Homily 14 Luke 2.21-24 56
  • Homily 15 Luke 2.25-29 62
  • Homily 16 Luke 2.33-34 65
  • Homily 17 Luke 2.33-38 70
  • Homily 18 Luke 2.40-49 76
  • Homily 19 Luke 2.40.4-6 80
  • Homily 20 Luke 2.49-51 84
  • Homily 21 Luke 3.1-4 88
  • Homily 22 Luke 3.5-8 92
  • Homily 23 Luke 3.9-12 97
  • Homily 24 Luke 3.15-16 103
  • Homily 25 Luke 3.15 105
  • Homily 26 Luke 3. 16-17 109
  • Homily 27 Luke 3.18-22 112
  • Homily 28 Luke 3.23-38 115
  • Homily 29 Luke 4.1-4 119
  • Homily 30 Luke 4.5-8 123
  • Homily 31 Luke 4.9-12 125
  • Homily 32 Luke 4.14-20 130
  • Homily 33 Luke 4.23-27 134
  • Homily 34 Luke 10.25-37 137
  • Homily 35 Luke 12.57-59 142
  • Homily 36 Luke 17.20-21, 33 151
  • Homily 37 Luke 19.29-40 153
  • Homily 38 Luke 19.41-45 156
  • Homily 39 Luke 20.21-40 159
  • Fragments on Luke 163
  • Indices 229
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