Dialogues concerning Two New Sciences

By Galileo Galilei; Henry Crew et al. | Go to book overview

[43]
TO THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS LORD COUNT OF NOAILLES

Counsellor of his Most Christian Majesty, Knight of the Order of the Holy Ghost, Field Marshal and Commander, Seneschal and Governor of Rouergue, and His Majesty's Lieutenant in Auvergne, my Lord and Worshipful Patron

MOST ILLUSTRIOUS LORD: -- In the pleasure which you derive from the possession of this work of mine I recognize your Lordship's magnanimity. The disappointment and discouragement I have felt over the ill-fortune which has followed my other books are already known to you. Indeed, I had decided not to publish any more of my work. And yet in order to save it from complete oblivion, it seemed to me wise to leave a manuscript copy in some place where it would be available at least to those who follow intelligently the subjects which I have treated. Accordingly I chose first to place my work in your Lordship's hands, asking no more worthy depository, and believing that, on account of your affection for me, you would have at heart the preservation of my studies and labors. Therefore, when you were returning home from your mission to Rome, I came to pay my respects in person as I had already done many times before by letter. At this meeting I presented to your Lordship a copy of these two works which at that time I happened to have ready. In the gracious reception which you gave these I found assurance of

-xvii-

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Dialogues concerning Two New Sciences
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page ii
  • Translators' Preface v
  • Introduction ix
  • [43] - To the Most Illustrious Lord Count of Noailles xvii
  • The Publisher to the Reader xix
  • Table of Contents *
  • First Day 1
  • Second Day 109
  • Third Day 153
  • Fourth Day 244
  • Appendix 295
  • Index 297
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