Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge

By Ed Regis | Go to book overview
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3
Heads Will Roll

Jokingly, Saul Kent used to tell his mother, Dora, that when she died he'd drop her body down a hole in a park somewhere. She ew that he was only kidding about this. Still . . .

Dora Kent wanted to live forever, just like her son did, and both of them had been interested in cryonics, the practice of freezing the newly dead for later revival, ever since it got going, which was back in the 1960s. The two of them had been early members of the Cryonics Society of New York, and Saul had even participated in one of the first freezings ever done, in the summer of 1968.

That was in the prehistoric era of cryonics, when the freezings were done by funeral directors. The science had come a long way since then, and by 1987, when Dora Kent was near death in a nursing home, there was a whole new freezing technology in place, with its own inventory of patient stabilization protocols, blood cooling procedures, cryoprotectant ramp rates, and so on, all of it to prepare the body for its long trip to eternity. Many of these techniques had been pioneered by the Alcor Life Extension Foundation of Riverside, California, which was regarded by many cryonicists as the world's most advanced cryonics organization. In fact, one of the reasons that Saul Kent himself lived in Riverside was to be right next door to Alcor.

So when Dora Kent went into the nursing home, it was with

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