Great Mambo Chicken and the Transhuman Condition: Science Slightly over the Edge

By Ed Regis | Go to book overview

8
Death of the Impossible

According to Barrow and Tipler in The Anthrapic Cosmological Principle, when intelligent life reaches the Omega Point then it will have "gained control of all matter and forces not only in a single universe, but in all universes whose existence is logically possible; life will have spread into all spatial regions in all universes which could logically exist, and will have stored an infinite amount of information, including all bits of knowledge which it is logically possible to know."

With people like Eric Drexler giving us complete control over the structure of matter, Hans Moravec making people over into near-omnipotent bush robots, Dave Criswell telling us how to make industrial stars and cultured black holes, and Eric Jones and Ben Finney showing us Mother Nature's own way of traveling to the stars -- with all this laid out in front of them, scientists pretty much knew all they needed to know to accomplish the whole Barrow and Tipler program. And as ambitious as it was, there was no reason to think that any of it was in the least impossible. Nothing predicted by Barrow and Tipler seemed to violate the known laws of nature; none of it invoked magic or mysticism. Quite the contrary, everything they envisioned seemed to follow naturally from the normal and ordinary progress of science.

In fact it was hard to think of anything that could prevent the

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