Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview
4.
A mulatto is a person with one white and one Negro parent or any person with mixed Caucasian and Negroid ancestry. A quadroon is a person with one-quarter Negro ancestry. An octoroon is a person with one white parent and one parent who is one-eighth Negro.
5.
The 1880 and 1890 Censuses gave the following instructions for coding responses related to Native American identity.

If this person is of full-blood of this tribe, enter "/." For mixture with another tribe, enter name of latter. For mixture with white, enter "W.;" with black, "B.;" with mulatto, "Mu."

If this is a white person adopted into the tribe, enter "W.A.;" if a negro or mulatto, enter "B.A."

If this person has been for any time habitually on the reservation, state the time in years or fractions.

If this person wears citizen's dress state the time in years or fractions since he or she has habitually so worn it.

If other than native language is spoken by this person, enter for English, "E.;" Spanish, "S.;" French, "F.;" &c.

7.
Beginning in 1989, the National Center for Health Statistics ( 1993) changed the rules for classifying mixed-race newborns so that this possibility existed. Prior to 1989, the child was assigned the same race as the nonwhite parent. In 1989, the baby was assigned to the same racial category as the mother, which means the baby was declared "white" even if the father was not. According to NCHC statistics, the majority of mixed race births were to mothers classified as white.

REFERENCES

Angelou, Maya. 1987. "Intra-Racism." Interview on the Oprah Winfrey Show. (Journal Graphics transcript #W172):2.

Beech, Hannah. 1996. "Don't You Dare List Them As 'Other.'" U.S. News and World Report. http://www.usnews.com/usnews/issue/birace.htm.

Brown, Prince Jr. Unpublished. "Biology and the Social Construction of the 'Race' Concept." Northern Kentucky University.

Finnegan, William. 1986. Crossing the Line: A Year in the Land of Apartheid. New York: Harper & Row.

Forbes, Jack D. 1990. "The Manipulation of Race, Caste and Identity: Classifying Afro Americans, Native Americans and Red-Black People." The Journal of Ethnic Studies 17( 4):23-25.

Gimenez, Martha E. 1989. "Latino/'Hispanic'--Who Needs a Name?: The Case Against a Standardized Terminology." International Journal of Health Services 19( 3):567-571.

Green, V. 1978. "The Black Extended Family in the United States: Some Research Suggestions." pp. 378-387 in The Extended Family in Black Societies, edited by D. B. Shimkin, E. M. Shimkin , and D. A. Frate. The Netherlands: Mouton DeGruyter.

Haney Ian F. López 1994. "The Social Construction of Race: Some Observations on Illusion, Fabrication, and Choice." Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberties Law Review 29:39-53.

Hunt, William M. 1993. U.S. General Accounting Office Data Collection: Measuring Race and Ethnicity is Complex and Controversial. "Testimony Before the Subcommittee on Census, Statistics, and Postal Personnel." Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

-22-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.