Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

The first two readings in this section take the view that discrimination has diminished in importance. Lawrence E. Harrison ( "How Cultural Values Shape Economic Success") makes the conservative argument that cultural differences between whites and people of color can explain the economic differences. William Julius Wilson ( "Societal Changes and Vulnerable Neighborhoods") argues that larger social changes are negatively impacting poor black inner-city neighborhoods.

The remaining eight readings, on the other hand, argue that discrimination is alive and well in the United States and has substantial negative impacts on people of color. Fred L. Pincus ( "From Individual to Structural Discrimination") begins this section with a discussion of different types of discrimination. In addition to discussing intentional discrimination at both an individual and structural level, he argues that some social policies that appear to be race-neutral in intent have discriminatory effects.

Douglass S. Massey ( "America's Apartheid and the Urban Underclass") argues that residential segregation against blacks is still a significant issue. This segregation causes concentrated poverty in black communities and limits opportunities for upward mobility.

The next three readings address the issue of employment discrimination. Marc Bendick, Jr. , Charles W. Jackson, and Victor A. Reinoso ( "Measuring Employment Discrimination Through Controlled Experiments") examine how Washington, D.C., employers reacted to black and white applicants with identical credentials. The good news is that most employers did not favor either the black or white applicant. The bad news is that when one was favored, it was usually the white that benefited.

Joleen Kirschenman and Kathryn M. Neckerman ( "'We'd Love to Hire Them, But . . .': The Meaning of Race for Employers") show that Chicago employers discriminate against poor black and Hispanic males because of the expectation that they will have poor work habits. Karen J. Hossfeld ( "Hiring Immigrant Women: Silicon Valley's 'Simple Formula'") shows how California's high-tech employers discriminate on the basis of gender as well as race and ethnicity.

Since most of the research on discrimination is about blacks, we have included readings on two rapidly growing race/ethnic groups. Joan Moore and Raquel Pinderhughes ( "Latinos and Discrimination") analyze the problems faced by Hispanics in the United States, and Pyong Gap Min ( "Major Issues Relating to Asian American Experiences") does the same for Asians.

Among the various policies intended to combat employment discrimination and provide equal opportunity is affirmative action. Fred L. Pincus ( "The Case for Affirmative Action") analyzes this controversial policy.


REFERENCES

Carter, Deborah J., and Reginald Wilson ( 1997) Minorities in Higher Education: 1996-1997, The Fifteenth Annual Status Report. Washington, D.C.: American Council on Education.

U.S. Bureau of the Census ( 1997a) Current Population Reports, Series P-60, No. 197, Money Income in the United States, 1996. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office.

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.