Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence

By Fred L. Pincus; Howard J. Ehrlich | Go to book overview

workers, is to reproduce the racially structured labor market and class structure that discriminates against minorities and immigrants. Another effect is that within the workplace, racial categories and racism become tools for management to divide and control workers. These are dynamics that individuals and organizations interested in social change must become more familiar with--not just in Silicon Valley but elsewhere. As for the situation in highly "innovative" Silicon Valley itself, to date, neither labor, women's, nor ethnic organizations have made major inroads in challenging the hiring hierarchy ( Hossfeld 1991). But challenge it we must. Equality of opportunity, both at work and away from it, cannot be achieved unless we learn to recognize and reject practices that are based on "simple formulas" about gender, race, and nationality.


NOTES
1.
As many recent scholars and activists have noted, the term "Third World" is problematic and imprecise. Yet so, too, are currently available substitute terms such as "postcolonial," "industrializing," and "developing." For references to the terminology debate from a feminist perspective, see Mohanty, Russo, and Torres, 1991. In this article, the term "Third World immigrants" refers to individuals who have migrated (in this case to the United States) from world regions with a history of colonial domination.
2.
Statistical references in this study have not been updated to reflect the 1990 census because the research was conducted, and refers to conditions, during the 1980s.
3.
These production jobs include the following U.S. Department of Labor occupational titles: semiconductor processor, semiconductor assembler, electronics assembler, and electronics tester. Entry-level wages for these jobs in Silicon Valley are $4.00-$5.50; wages for workers with one to two years' experience or more are $5.50-$8.00 an hour, with testers sometimes earning up to $9.50. California Department of Employment Development 1983.
4.
This is especially true of Asian communities. The Vietnamese, for example, have founded several business associations, and own several blocks of businesses in downtown San Jose. Hispanic groups have a much smaller business ownership base, although there is a Hispanic Chamber of Commerce in the area.
5.
For a more extensive discussion of how gender ideologies are used as the basis of both labor control and labor resistance in this work force, see Hossfeld 1990.
6.
The student team was composed of University of California at Santa Cruz undergraduates, aged eighteen to twenty-five.
7.
In Silicon Valley, the low proportion of Black workers correlates to the low proportion of Blacks in the overall county labor force, 3.11 percent.
9.
Japanese Americans are among the top income earners in the United States, while Blacks and Hispanics are among the lowest in income. For evidence that Japanese and other Asian Americans have had to work harder for relatively lower economic status than Whites, see Woo 1985.
10.
For discussion of how immigrant women workers resist managers' efforts to use racism and sexism as forms of labor control, see Hossfeld 1990. For discussion of barriers to labor organizing around these issues, see Hossfeld 1991.

-177-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race and Ethnic Conflict: Contending Views on Prejudice, Discrimination, and Ethnoviolence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen
/ 466

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.